In this day and age, the success in the battle against measles has been largely attributed to the vaccine, but a recent death in Washington state marks the first time in 12 years that anyone in the United States has died from this disease. The woman, a resident of Clallam County (Washington) died this spring and an autopsy revealed that the cause of death was an due to an undetected measles infection.

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“The woman was most likely exposed to measles at a local medical facility during a recent outbreak in Clallam County. She was there at the same time as a person who later developed a rash and was contagious for measles. The woman had several other health conditions and was on medications that contributed to a suppressed immune system. She didn’t have some of the common symptoms of measles such as a rash, so the infection wasn’t discovered until after her death. The cause of death was pneumonia due to measles.” (source)

Approximately 50 years ago, measles was fairly common. From most of the elders we’ve spoken to, it was normal – you would get it, get better, and then be immune to it for the rest of your life. In the 1960s it began to rapidly die off. Death via measles was a rare thing, just as it is in the present day, which has largely been attributed to vaccination. More recently, controversy has begun to arise as many people are now questioning the Measles Mumps Rubella (MMR) vaccine (more on this later in the article), while others are pointing fingers at parents who choose not to vaccinate their child. So many people are confused, and so many people don’t know what to believe anymore, but what’s causing the confusion? There is simply too much conflicting data. We have a wealth of scientific data (although all of it is industry sponsored) which supports vaccination in general and the MMR vaccine specifically. On the other hand, we also have a wealth of scientific data that does not. (See a heavily sourced article that examines this data HERE.) So what are parents supposed to believe? It’s not hard to see why they are so confused, and pointing fingers at people (the way mainstream media tends to do at parents who choose not to vaccinate) is definitely not the answer.

The best way is to simply look at the information from a neutral standpoint so you can make the best possible decision for your child. While doing this, it’s best to stay away from heavy marketing influences like television, and stick to examining all of the information that’s out there. 

Other Variables

Even if an individual does receive a vaccine, their immune system may still be weakened due to a number of factors. In this particular case, as stated above, the woman had other health problems and was taking medication which compromised her immune system. She had also apparently already been vaccinated, but the drugs she was taking “also suppress immune protection to measles from vaccination or from having had the disease.” Health authorities refused to specify her prior ailment. (source)(source)

“Even when vaccinated, they (people) may not have a good immune response when exposed to disease; they may be especially vulnerable to disease outbreaks.” (source)

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The MMR Vaccine Controversy

If you come to this section and think that there is no controversy, or you think that the MMR vaccine is completely necessary and has been proven to be completely, 100 percent safe and effective, then you are misinformed. Despite the fact that we have been bombarded with the idea that this vaccine is essential to public health safety and is responsible for saving countless lives, there is evidence to the contrary, and in fact no solid evidence to suggest it works the way doctors claim.

Measles vaccination in the US and many other countries started in the early 1960s, at the time when measles was naturally disappearing and was heading for an 18 year low. This is why the vaccine is commonly associated with lowered incidence rates. It must be acknowledged that reports of outbreaks and epidemics of measles in even 100% vaccinated populations have filled the pages of many medical journals.

Is the effectiveness of the measles vaccine really as strong as we’ve been made to believe it is? Many like to point towards the fact that there is no “scientific” evidence showing that it is harmful (there is), despite the fact that the same argument is used to support the vaccination. Causation does not mean correlation, right?

Let’s take a look at some studies which are not broadcast in the mainstream media and which suggest that vaccinated individuals can still contract and spread measles. If this is the case, what’s the point of a vaccine?

A few years ago, a study published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases – whose authorship includes scientists working for the Bureau of Immunization, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA – looked at evidence from the 2011 New York measles outbreak which showed that individuals with prior evidence of measles vaccination and vaccine immunity were both capable of being infected with measles and infecting others with it (secondary transmission).

The study concluded that “measles may occur in vaccinated individuals, but secondary transmission from such individuals has not been documented.”

The study found that:

Of 88 contacts, four secondary cases were confirmed that had either two doses of measles-containing vaccine or a past positive measles IgG antibody. All cases had laboratory confirmation of measles infection, clinical symptoms consistent with measles, and high avidity IgG antibody characteristic of a secondary immune response. This is the first report of measles transmission from a twice vaccinated individual. The clinical presentation and laboratory data of the index were typical of measles in a naïve individual. Secondary cases had robust anamnestic antibody responses. No tertiary cases occurred despite numerous contacts. This outbreak underscores the need for thorough epidemiological and laboratory investigation of suspected measles cases regardless of vaccination status. (source)

Again, a twice-vaccinated individual, from a NYC measles outbreak, was found to have transmitted measles to four of her contacts, two of which themselves had received two doses of MMR vaccine and had prior, presumably protective, measles IgG antibody results.

Is it possible we are seeing a failing vaccine rather than a failure to vaccinate?

Through the 1980s, measles outbreaks in fully vaccinated children happened all over the US and other countries with high vaccination rates, yet most people don’t know about this, and we definitely don’t hear about it.

For example:

Barratta et al. (1970) investigated an outbreak in Florida from December 1968 to February 1969 and found little difference in the incidence of measles in vaccinated and unvaccinated children.

Robertson et al. (1992) wrote that in 1985 and 1986, 152 measles outbreaks in US school-age children occurred among persons who had previously received the measles vaccine. “Every 2-3 years, there is an upsurge of measles irrespective of vaccination compliance.”

The largely unvaccinated Amish (they claim religious exemption) had not reported a single case of measles between 1970 and December 1987, for 18 years (Sutter et al. 1991).

MMWR (2009) reported that the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had reminded physicians about the importance of immunization against measles in response to outbreaks of the disease in the US. 64 cases of measles were noted between January 1 and April 15 2008.

Linnemann et al. (1973) concluded that measles vaccines were not provoking a proper immunological response in vaccinated children.

A widespread outbreak of measles was reported across Europe during European Immunization Week (April 25, 2011). Some 6,500 cases of measles were reported in 30 countries according to WHO’s press release.

There is plenty more where that came from.

All of these cases have resulted in more doses of this vaccine as we move through time. But again, is the problem failure to vaccinate, or failure of the vaccine itself?

There is also the case of something called atypical measles. It is less well known to the general public that some vaccinated children started developing an especially vicious form of measles due to the altered host immune response caused by the deleterious effect of the measles vaccines. It resisted all orthodox treatment and carried a high mortality rate.

For the sake of time I won’t go into atypical measles or all of the studies that deal with other adverse reactions of the vaccine.

Measles Vaccine Failures Documented for a Quarter of a Century, Around the World

In 2010, there were a number of children in Croatia who had contracted the measles that were fully vaccinated (source). The interesting thing about this case was the fact that not only had they become infected with measles from the vaccine strain, rather than the normal “natural” strain, but they were also contagious.

Here are two other documented examples of this:

Differentiating the wild from the attenuated during a measles outbreak. Communicable Disease Control, Alberta Health Services. Paediatricians and Child Health, Apr. 2012; 17(4) (Abstract)

Case of vaccine-associated measles five weeks post-immunisation, Eurosurveillance, Volume 18, Issue 49, 05 December 2013 (Full Text)

1985, Texas, USA: According to an article published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1987, “An outbreak of measles occurred among adolescents in Corpus Christi, Texas, in the spring of 1985, even though vaccination requirements for school attendance had been thoroughly enforced.” They concluded that “outbreaks of measles can occur in secondary schools, even when more than 99 percent of the students have been vaccinated and more than 95 percent are immune.” (source)

1985, Montana, USA: According to an article published in the American Journal of Epidemiology titled, “A persistent outbreak of measles despite appropriate prevention and control measures,” an outbreak of 137 cases of measles occurred in Montana. School records indicated that 98.7% of students were appropriately vaccinated, leading the researchers to conclude: “This outbreak suggests that measles transmission may persist in some settings despite appropriate implementation of the current measles elimination strategy.”(source)

1988, Colorado, USA: According to an article published in the American Journal of Public Health in 1991, “In early 1988 an outbreak of 84 measles cases occurred at a college in Colorado in which over 98 percent of students had documentation of adequate measles immunity… due to an immunization requirement in effect since 1986. They concluded: “…measles outbreaks can occur among highly vaccinated college populations.” (source)

1989, Quebec, Canada: According to an article published in the Canadian Journal of Public Health in 1991, a 1989 measles outbreak was “largely attributed to an incomplete vaccination coverage,” but following an extensive review the researchers concluded that “incomplete vaccination coverage is not a valid explanation for the Quebec City measles outbreak.” (source)

1991-1992, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: According to an article published in the journal Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical, in a measles outbreak from March 1991 to April 1992 in Rio de Janeiro, 76.4% of those suspected to be infected had received measles vaccine before their first birthday. (source)

1992, Cape Town, South Africa: According to an article published in the South African Medical Journal in 1994, “[In] August 1992 an outbreak occurred, with cases reported at many schools in children presumably immunised.” Immunization coverage for measles was found to be 91%, and vaccine efficacy found to be only 79%, leading them to conclude that primary and secondary vaccine failure was a possible explanation for the outbreak. (source)


“The case against science is straightforward: much of the scientific literature, perhaps half, may simply be untrue.” – Dr. Richard Horton, Editor and Chief of The Lancet

When it comes to the MMR vaccine and fraud, a more recent example (and perhaps one of the biggest) would be long time CDC scientist, Dr. William Thompson. He has authored and co-authored dozens of studies, many of which are commonly pointed out by the “pro-vaccine” movement often showing no link between MMR and autism:

“The CDC has put the research 10 years behind, because the CDC has not been transparent. We’ve missed 10 years of research because the CDC is so paralyzed right now by anything related to autism. Really what we need is for congress to come in and say, give us the data.” (22)

He pointed to a specific study that he co-authored, a 2004 CDC study commonly cited and used by the scientific community, among others, that determined:

“The evidence is now convincing that the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine does not cause autism or any particular subtypes of autism spectrum disorder.” (21)

He also alluded to another study published in the Journal of Pediatrics that concluded the same thing.

A few months ago he publicly stated:

It’s the lowest point in my career that I went along with that paper and uh, I went along with this, we didn’t report significant findings. I’m completely ashamed of what I did, I have great shame now that I was complicit and went along with this, I have been a part of the problem. 

He also went on to say that vaccines cause “tic” as well as stating:

“I regret that my co-authors and I omitted statistically significant information in our 2004 article,” Thompson said in a statement sent to CNN by his lawyer. “I have had many discussions with Dr. Brian Hooker over the last 10 months regarding studies the CDC has carried out regarding vaccines and neurodevelopmental outcomes, including autism spectrum disorders. I share his belief that CDC decision-making and analyses should be transparent.”

Thompson made the call to scientist Dr. Brian Hooker, who published the real findings, which showed that there was a 340 percent increased chance of autism in African American boys receiving the MMR vaccine on time. The study was published in the peer-reviewed journal Translational Neurodegeneration and was retracted a couple of days later. (source)




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