What will the future look like? It’s a question we’ve asked ourselves and others time and time again, fantasizing about what will be while simultaneously doubting the technological advancements conjured up by individuals and fiction alike.

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Whereas flying cars used to be our idea of the future, they’ve become a cliche in a world where so many other incredible advancements have made things we never thought possible come to be. Self-driving cars, 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs, babies being born with three peoples’ DNA to prevent genetic diseases, animal cloning, the world’s smallest desktop coming in at two inches square, and so much more.

Predicting the future is a talent, but skeptics tend to ignore or even ridicule such people’s attempts at exposing truths. Yet time and time again, people have proven their predictions to be true, like in 1783, when Ezra Stiles, then president of Yale University, predicted the U.S. population would reach 300 million by 1983. And in 1987, Roger Ebert predicted video-on-demand services Netflix and Hulu.

Dystopian novelist Octavia Butler predicted Donald Trump’s campaign slogan back in the ‘90s. Almost 20 years prior to Trump trademarking the phrase “Make America great again,” Butler wrote about a character named Senator Andrew Steele Jarret who used the same slogan while running for office during a period of isolationism, religious intolerance, and duress. She also wrote an essay titled  “A Few Rules For Predicting The Future” for Essence Magazine in 2000 which offered a tongue-in-cheek look at how widespread predicting the future is.

Yet there are plenty of people who balk at giving credit to predictors, claiming such scientific and technological developments as credit cards, MRIs, and IVF are progressive and inevitable, not miraculous at all. But still, there are some cases that required one imaginative person’s brain to speak up with an outlandish idea for certain things to exist in today’s world.

When it comes to science fiction, inventiveness and creativity make for some incredible stories that bring us readers into whimsical worlds that we allow ourselves to get lost in, convincing us that such a life could, indeed, exist. Real-world creators and inventors often find themselves inspired by the fantastic realms of sci-fi to make worlds many have only dreamt of into actual reality.

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WeBuyAnyCar.com created an infographic that provides 10 examples of how transportation technology has, in fact, imitated or been inspired by science fiction of the past, proving the overlap between such unimaginable worlds and our own mundane reality is greater than we think.

The infographic couples futuristic transportation technology from books and films written over the past 130 years with current, existing technology or things that will likely exist in the near future, like Michel Verne’s 1888 short story, Un Express de L’Avenir (An Express of the Future) and Tesla inventor Elon Musk’s hyperloop system, thought to have a working prototype by the end of this year.

Check out the other technologies listed, like electric cars, jet packs, and hovercrafts in the infographic below, which makes references to cutting-edge tech like driverless cars, hover boards, and space travel by way of pop culture classics like Back To The Future II.

Article cover photo source.

 

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