Brock Turner is a name that we shouldn’t know.

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But we do, because he sexually assaulted an unconscious woman behind a dumpster in 2015, and for that, he spent a mere three months behind bars. Having initially only been ordered a disturbing nine-month jail sentence, which outraged the masses, the news of Turner walking out of a California jail six months before his already minor time behind bars was up really sparked controversy and anger.

We know this man’s name because he both broke the law as well as exposed how unjust the law can be. A Canadian judge faulted a 19-year-old rape victim for not doing enough to defend herself from being sexually assaulted by Turner. The judge asked the young woman questions like “Why couldn’t you just keep your knees together? Why didn’t you just sink your bottom down into the basin so he couldn’t penetrate you?” The entire case has proved everything from offensive to downright wrong; yet, Turner has become a free and famous man because of what he did. 

Turner’s offense came at a time of sensitivity, as a plethora of cases popped up around the nation of young women being raped. Even more alarming is how tough it seems to be to give rapists proper punishment.

Trent Mays and Ma’lik Richmond are two other names we should not know.

In 2012, the high school football players were charged with kidnapping and raping a 16-year-old girl. They had taken her from a volleyball game, driven across state lines, drugged her, stripped her naked, repeatedly gang-raped her, tossed her in the trunk of a car, urinated on her, defecated on her, and left her for dead in a field. For their crime, Mays and Richmond were sentenced to a minimum of one year in a juvenile prison.

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While the town of Steubenville, Ohio, population 18,000, is trying to move forward, both disgusted by the act itself and the slimy excuse of a sentence the rapists were given, news has erupted again that’s equally as disturbing.

An anonymous computer hacker, who helped expose the atrocious 2012 Steubenville gang rape of a 16-year-old girl, faces a 16-year jail term. It’s the type of news that might have you throwing your hands in the air in disbelief and outrage and perhaps cause you to want to do something about this growing rape culture and the judiciary’s incapability of giving rapists sentences that match their crimes.

The duo hacked the website between December 21 and December 25, 2012, posting a video that revealed many students poking fun at the rape victim. She was called “the dead girl.” The hackers threatened to disclose details of the school faculty members and parents plotting to cover up the gang rape if the “rape crew” didn’t expose themselves and apologize.

Their video sparked national attention and eventually paved the path for enough evidence accumulating against the rapists, causing Mays and Richard to be convicted of the rape of a minor. Richmond was back to playing football a few days after serving only 10 months out of a one-year sentence in a juvenile detention facility, while Mays became the star quarterback at Ohio’s Hocking College after spending just two years behind bars.

anonymous vigilante

The FBI responded to Lostutter in a shocking way. Rather than thanking him for exposing the rapists, they raided his home and arrested him in April 2013. Lostutter pleaded not guilty and was let go on supervised release upon awaiting his trail. Then, in July 2016, he was indicted by a federal grand jury for allegedly “conspiring to access an online account to draw attention to a 2012 high-school rape case in Ohio.”

The four-count indictment charged the hacker with three counts of unauthorized access of a computer affecting interstate communication to commit an invasion of privacy and libel and one count of making a false statement to the FBI.

“I don’t understand why they are prosecuting somebody who basically helped expose the rape of a minor… This is not a situation where somebody, you know, hacked a hospital or took down a nuclear power plant.  This was an act of political protest about the rape of a 16-year-old girl,” Tor Ekeland, Lostutter’s attorney said.

While McHugh pled guilty and admitted to hacking RollRedRoll.com, on September 7, Lostutter pleaded not guilty to four felony counts. His trial is scheduled to begin November 8 and he faces up to 16 years in prison.

“You get 16 years for forcibly entering your way into a computer, but you get one year for forcibly entering your way into a woman. I think that’s the precedent the government is setting here.”


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