Creating change through transforming consciousness. Learn more about CE's Mission!

Next Story

  We're creating viewer supported news. Become a member!

The moon is something we see on a regular basis, as it brightens up the dark night sky, reminding us of the incredible universe outside of our planet. NASA scientists have been studying the mystery and power of the moon for decades, and have determined its ability to provide them with a better understanding of what is happening on other planets and objects within the solar system. According to Noah Petro, deputy project scientist for NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission, the moon is “the Rosetta Stone by which we understand the rest of the solar system.”

advertisement - learn more

For more than seven years, LRO has been mapping the moon’s surface and capturing high resolution images to help scientists learn more about our planet’s history, while also helping them to better understand and provide the public with more in-depth knowledge of planetary objects that exceed the Earth-moon system.

“Because we have the Apollo samples, we can tie what we see from orbit to those surface samples and make inferences about what has happened to the moon throughout its lifetime,” Petro explained. “The samples tell us how old certain lunar surfaces are, and based on the number of impact craters on those surfaces, we can estimate the ages of the rest of the moon. Furthermore, we can then apply those models to estimate the ages of surface on other planets in our solar system — all by studying the moon!”

Every full moon, people embrace the beauty, the power and the unavoidable energy it brings on an astronomical and astrological level. Even just a simple picture can be so insanely breathtaking.

The anticipation of the November supermoon proved abundant, as the moon offered a massive, luminous sight to behold thanks to the Earth’s lunar friend being closer than usual, resulting from its elliptical orbit around our planet.

The perigee of this orbit is about 30,000 miles closer to Earth than the apogee, which is the farthest point in the orbit. A supermoon can be as much as “14 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter than an apogee full moon,” according to NASA. But November’s supermoon was significantly extraordinary because it marks the closest the full moon has been to the Earth since 1948.

advertisement - learn more

NASA called it an “extra-super moon” that won’t occur again until 2034, when it will be even closer to the Earth than it is now.

On a very basic level, the idea of just viewing this historical moon proved jaw-dropping, with photographers from around the world showing up to snap some sensational images.

Here are some of the best shots taken of the intense November supermoon that will make you relish in its beauty as well as the many environments and landmarks that exist around our world:

Beijing, China:

supermoon

Associated Press

Glastonbury, England:

supermoonReuters

New York, New York:

supermoon

Associated Press

Hanau, Germany:

supermoonReuters

Beijing, China:

supermoon

Associated Press

London, England:

supermoon

Cordoba, Spain:

supermoon

Associated Press

Gauhati, India:

supermoon

Associated Press

London, England:

supermoon

Reuters

Sydney, Australia:

supermoon

Reuters

Cannon Ball, North Dakota:

supermoon

South El Monte, California:

supermoon

Associated Press

New York, New York:

supermoon

Reuters

Baikonur, Kazakhstan:

supermoon

Reuters

Sapporo, Japan:

supermoon

Reuters

 


Having Trouble Losing Excess Weight?

Having trouble losing excess weight? This could be one of the biggest reasons why.

We know so much about food now yet much of the population is overweight and unhealthy because of the quality of our food and our perception about food.

Luckily there's a quiz that you can take to find out where you stand on food addiction. You can take it here.

After you will get results and specific information based on your score. Try the quiz!

Are You Addicted To Food?

Take the quiz to find out. Take the quiz!

×

No more articles