Connect with us

My Two Weeks With Classical Music

Published

on

I was sitting at home alone on a Wednesday night when I decided to spend the rest of my night watching a movie on Netflix. I had never heard of it prior to choosing it, but something intrigued me about the film ‘Liberal Arts.’ It most likely was the decent rating and 97 minute runtime that primarily drew me to it, but I also like to think me and the film had some form of an agreement to be watched.

advertisement - learn more

For the most part the film is a relatively simple love and friendship story, but there is one part to the film that inspired me to challenge myself in my own life. Within the film, one of the characters introduces the other to the idea of listening to classical music in replacement of whatever they were normally accustomed to listening to. The character then began to listen to the suggested playlist when driving, traveling to work, while walking in the park, etc.  Through this process the character becomes amazed by both the experiential process he is going through, and the impact the music is having on his life. The overall impact this segment has within the entirety of the film is minimal, but it still managed to inspire me to try it out in my own life.

For the past two weeks, aside from when at public places where I could not control the music or when watching a film or playing a game that had other music within it, I listened to nothing but classical music. I listened to it while driving, writing, working out, walking, you name it! And I have to say I really enjoyed the experience. Here are some of the highlights I’d like to share in regards to what I noticed:

  • Unlike other music (and I am sure there are exceptions), classical music promotes creativity rather then disempowering it by drawing all of your attention. It is easily fades into the background and allowed me to stay focused on whatever it was that I was doing at the same time.
  • It helped to keep me in the moment. It was as if it took the place of the mind chatter I had gotten so accustomed to, allowing me to more easily focus and fully experience everything that I did.
  • The world seemed like a truly beautiful creation. It seemed like every person, animal and experience I came across was that much easier to appreciate rather then judge or just passively dismiss.
  • The music always sounds new. I only downloaded four 15-minute songs before starting this process and I can tell you now despite hearing each one numerous times I never knew what was coming. It always seemed like a completely new experience, which is the polar opposite to what I am used to, as even the songs I have no interest or intention of becoming familiar with I somehow find myself singing along to as they play on the radio.
  • I never found myself irritated by or tired of what I was listening to. The same 4 songs somehow always stayed fresh and interesting, or as I like to look at it: they stayed as the perfect soundtrack to those two weeks of life.

So do I plan to listen to only classical music for the rest of my life? No, certainly not, but I definitely have a greater appreciation for it and will always be open to listening to it whenever I feel pulled to. Whether you are already familiar with classical music or not, I’d suggest trying this out even just for a day. I can’t promise the same results or experiences that I had/ found, but it definitely is worth trying.

For those that are interested the four songs I listened to were all non-vocal classical music written by one of the great composers but performed and recorded by the London Symphony Orchestra. Did I choose these on purpose? No, they just were the first to come up in my ITunes search. 🙂

advertisement - learn more
Advertisement
advertisement - learn more

Alternative News

BREAKING: Shots Fired During Toronto Raptors Parade Causes Stampede (Video)

Published

on

Breaking news out of Toronto as celebrations were taking place to mark the NBA championship the Toronto Raptors won last week. Shots have been fired during the Raptors parade causing panic which sparked a stampede of people leaving the area. Some people reported being trampled during the panic.

So far, 2 people have been arrested and police say 2 people have suffered injuries, but they are not life-threatening.

As we know more we will report, but this will surely spark some sort of ‘gun regulation’ discussion.

Videos below show scenes of what happened in Toronto.

And another video from another angle:

Help Support Collective Evolution

The demand for Collective Evolution's content is bigger than ever, except ad agencies and social media keep cutting our revenues. This is making it hard for us to continue.

In order to stay truly independent, we need your help. We are not going to put up paywalls on this website, as we want to get our info out far and wide. For as little as $3 a month, you can help keep CE alive!

SUPPORT CE HERE!

cards

Continue Reading

Alternative News

WHAT?! Marineland Is Officially Exempt From Canada’s Ban On Whale & Dolphin Captivity

Published

on

Image: 123RF

In Brief

  • The Facts:

    Canada recently passed a bill that bans the capture and captivity of whales and dolphins. Marineland, a huge whale/dolphin entertainment park, has been exempted from the law that makes it illegal to do so.

  • Reflect On:

    What gives human beings the right to hold such majestic, innocent, benevolent and intelligent animals captive? What gives them the right to separate them from their families? Why do we treat other beings on Earth the way we do?

Animal captivity is extremely cruel and heartbreaking. Imagine what another intelligent, benevolent race would think if they came across our planet and observed what we do. My guess is that they’d be terrified to attempt to interact with us simply based on how we treat other sentient, benevolent beings on this planet.

Canada recently passed a legislation that completely bans keeping whales, dolphins and porpoises in captivity for entertainment, trade, possession, capture and breeding. The bill (S-203) is also known as the “Ending the Captivity of Whales and Dolphins Act,” and it was approved by the House of Commons after they voted in favour of the bill, which was first introduced in 2015.

The only time capture is permitted in Canada is for rescue purposes or, unfortunately, for scientific purposes.

According to Green Party Leader MP Elizabeth May, “Canadians have been clear, they want the cruel practice of keeping whales and dolphins in captivity to end… With the passage of Bill S-203, we have ensured that this will happen.”

More than 20 marine scientists and stakeholder organizations endorsed the bill, which quite frankly should have happened long ago. These beings, or any beings for that matter, do not belong in tanks where they are constantly suffering. These are extremely emotional, social, empathetic and brilliant beings. What we’ve done to them and continue to do to them is beyond horrid, to be blunt.

This bill was supposed to phase out this type of captivity in Canada, but that doesn’t seem to be the case, as Marineland Canada’s whales will remain at the park following the page of S-203. Already captive whales will remain in captivity, which means approximately 60 animals will live out their entire lives at Marineland and at the Vancouver Aquarium.

advertisement - learn more

Canadian law now states that it’s a criminal offence, as it should be, to keep a cetacean in captivity, but it looks like Marineland Canada has been exempted from this. It does not seem, however, that they can bring more animals into the park, but they’ll more than likely begin breeding programs to keep their business going for as long as they can.

According to Marie Holer, a representative from Marineland Canada:

We’ve been working to evolve Marineland for over a year and have made many positive changes to the park, including the new educational presentation on marine mammals, the introduction of the Marineland Express and our Polar Splash pad that will open in July. Since opening day, we’ve seen our largest crowds in years and are thrilled that so many people support us in our work. We’re looking forward to enhancing our education, conservation and research focus in the short term to highlight our commitment to marine mammals.”

Is this truly a good step? As long as these animals are in captivity, there can be no care given to these animals. Why do we as human beings feel we can imprison animals like this is simply for entertainment? It feels heartbreaking, confusing, and makes deeply question the state of our connection to wildlife.

Have we really become that disconnected from life?

It’s not all bleak though! Things are obviously improving, and that’s become quite evident thanks to the vast amount of activism over the years that has finally resulted in the passing of the legislation mentioned in this article, but we still have a long way to go.

Remember, these animals have never really shown any type of aggression towards humans, except in captivity.

The Takeaway

Why do human beings go to the circus? Why do they go to places like Marineland? Is it because human beings are terrible? No. It’s simply because many of us have been desensitized and have not quite questioned this in many ways. Which is OK! That’s part of the process. When it comes to animal captivity, mass marketing and scientific justifications have allowed our minds to be manipulated. They’ve made us think that animal captivity is okay, when clearly we would not like to be confined against our will, so why do it to others?

I believe that we’re all born as extremely understanding beings, and that humans are a very empathetic race. I believe that our feelings and our ability to experience empathy are what makes us special. I also believe that these traits and characteristics left us for a while, but they are now returning and we are beginning to “think” from our hearts again.

This is why awareness regarding animal captivity has increased and will continue to increase around the globe until it is completely banned everywhere, or until people simply stop showing up to these places and providing them with profits.

Help Support Collective Evolution

The demand for Collective Evolution's content is bigger than ever, except ad agencies and social media keep cutting our revenues. This is making it hard for us to continue.

In order to stay truly independent, we need your help. We are not going to put up paywalls on this website, as we want to get our info out far and wide. For as little as $3 a month, you can help keep CE alive!

SUPPORT CE HERE!

cards

Continue Reading

Lifestyle

Sleep Debt: Can We Compensate For Sleep Deprivation On Weekends?

Published

on

In Brief

  • The Facts:

    A recently study reveals the link between sleeping in on weekends and lowered mortality risk, yet another study shows that night owls have a 10% higher mortality risk than morning people, emphasizing that this is a public health issue.

  • Reflect On:

    Is our obsession with “sleep compensation” just an unhealthy way to try to overcome the reality of socially imposed timing? Is consistency and rhythm more important than the number of hours we sleep?

The idea of “paying off sleep debt” that accumulates throughout the work week has thus far been widely dismissed as wishful thinking. The general consensus is that you either get enough sleep each night or you don’t – and cramming in a few extra hours on your days off, although it might feel good, can’t possibly fix the physiological damage caused by sleep deprivation.

But here’s some great news for all of us who’ve been hoping that the sleep debt we pile on could somehow be paid off on those blissful weekend mornings. A study published in 2018 in the Journal of Sleep Research suggests that we may be able to “catch up on sleep” after all, by sleeping in on our days off.

It’s not that straightforward, however.

A different take on sleep deprivation research

For this study, researchers gathered the data of more than 38,000 adults from Sweden, which was collected in a medical survey in 1997. The survey included two questions that were keys to this research: one about sleep duration during workdays/weeknights, and the other concerning sleep duration on days off.

And that’s exactly what makes this study stand out from the previous research concerning sleep deprivation and mortality risk. Previous studies focused on questions about the “usual” sleep duration of participants, while this one focuses specifically on the link between the “usual” sleep duration and the occurrence of sleeping in.

Using Sweden’s national death register, the research team followed up on the cohort for 13 years, controlling for the factors that can contribute to health or mortality risk (gender, smoking, BMI, etc.)

advertisement - learn more

They found that those who slept 5 hours or less per night had a 65% higher risk of death during the study period than those who slept 6-7 hours nightly. However, the participants with short weekday sleep who habitually slept in on weekends didn’t appear to have an increased mortality risk.

Now, these findings clearly lead to the assumption that we could compensate for lost sleep in some way, but it’s far from definitive proof. A weekend sleep-in may be able to mitigate the effects of weeklong exhaustion, but there’s certainly a limit, as many physiological changes induced by cumulative sleep debt can be long-term.

Perhaps a more important factor than the number of extra hours of sleep is consistency and the possibility of establishing well-timed cycles of regular sleep and sleeping in.

In the end, no matter how we put it, our search for recurring sleep compensation reflects a deeper issue.

Night owls in a morning lark’s world

Another study published in 2018 concludes that “night owls” have a 10% higher mortality risk than “larks,” AKA “morning people.” Drawing from data of nearly half a million participants, this study also stands out from the rest in the field as it is the first to focus on mortality risk.

The researchers took into account the expected health problems identified in night owls in previous studies (such as cardiovascular disease and metabolic dysfunction) and still found the increased mortality risk.  

The findings, although new, aren’t very shocking, considering the adjustment evening types make to adapt to the socially imposed timing of work and all other activities.

Kristen Knutson, the co-lead author of the study, puts it best, saying in a statement: “Night owls trying to live in a morning lark world may have health consequences for their bodies. It could be that people who are up late have an internal biological clock that doesn’t match their external environment.”

The study further shows higher rates of diabetes, psychological disorders, and neurological disorders among people who stay up late. The researchers emphasize that this is a public health issue that we need to pay attention to, both in regards to making work schedules more flexible and researching the possibility of shifting owls’ body clocks.

Becoming a lark

The issue with relying on weekends to make up for lost sleep, despite the reported benefits, is that come Monday, things are bound to get really tough when that alarm rings. The study on weekend sleep examined mortality rates – not the optimal hours of extra sleep, or the difficulty of getting your circadian rhythm back on track. In short, it might sound like great news at first, but if you’re eager to overdo it with sleeping in every weekend, you’ll still be stuck in a vicious cycle of sleep deprivation.

This is difficult to embrace for night owls, myself included. But in the end, shifting your body clock to become more of a morning person is a better solution for so many reasons. And it’s easier than it sounds at first. With the rising popularity of natural sleeping aids such as CBD oil and techniques such as meditation, millions of people are finding a healthy alternative to dangerous sleep meds to help them start going to bed earlier, get quality sleep, and establish a consistent rhythm.

Don’t worry, you’re not doomed. Committing to going to bed early and keeping a consistent sleeping schedule is just the formation of a habit. It’s shifting your behavior which, with time, will adjust your internal body clock.

And remember: it’s easy to slip into old habits and binge-sleep on weekends, and then count sheep on Sunday night. Forming any good habit takes effort and discipline, which means you might have to go back to square one a few times before you get the hang of it.

Help Support Collective Evolution

The demand for Collective Evolution's content is bigger than ever, except ad agencies and social media keep cutting our revenues. This is making it hard for us to continue.

In order to stay truly independent, we need your help. We are not going to put up paywalls on this website, as we want to get our info out far and wide. For as little as $3 a month, you can help keep CE alive!

SUPPORT CE HERE!

cards

Continue Reading
advertisement - learn more
advertisement - learn more

Video

Pod