Connect with us

Awareness

How Inflammation Could Be Preventing You From Losing Weight & Foods To Help You Combat It

Published

on

Many people believe that inflammation causes a variety of ailments and diseases, and this is true, at least to some degree. But inflammation is also a natural, healthy response to cellular damage, and the response of a healthy immune system to a perceived threat. Chronic Inflammation, however, is a symptom of something negative happening in the body, and it forces us to investigate and discover the root cause of our discomfort.

advertisement - learn more

When inflammation happens it acts as an alarm to the body, telling it to bring in disease fighting cells and extra nutrition to heal the damage on the area. When any part of the body is inflamed, it is either damaged and healing or damaged and deteriorating.

In this case, damage is cause by cell trauma. External force or internal trauma is caused either by toxicity of some kind and/or a lack of nutrition, which leads to cells malfunctioning.

So when our intestinal tract is inflamed, we are not absorbing nutrients, putting us into starvation mode which in turn results in elevated levels of cortisol, which can cause a myriad of different illnesses.

Symptons

  • Ongoing, irritating pain in the body (like the joints or muscles)
  • Allergies or asthma (especially when they keep getting worse)
  • High blood pressure or blood sugar problems
  • Ulcers and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (constipation or diarrhea)
  • Constant fatigue or lethargy
  • Skin problems or red, bloodshot eyes

Below is a list of Anti-Inflammatory Foods to help you combat inflammation, courtesy of Live Science and Prevention:

advertisement - learn more
  • Cold-water fish: These are among the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids. Jimenez recommended salmon, herring, tuna and mackerel and advised consuming two or three servings (about 12 ounces or 340 grams) per week.
  • Avocados: “Avocados have great anti-inflammatory properties,” said Laura Flores, a San Diego-based nutritionist. They contain “phytosterols, carotenoid antioxidants, omega 3 fatty acids and polyhydroxolated fatty alcohols” — compounds that can help reduce inflammation. A 2013 study in the journal Food & Function found that people who ate a hamburger with avocado had lower CRP levels four hours after eating than those who did not.
  • Broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables: Broccoli, Brussels sprout, kale and cauliflower and other green leafy veggies contain sulforaphane, which is associated with blocking enzymes that are linked to joint deterioration and, consequently, chronic inflammation, according to Victoria Jarzabkowski, a nutritionist with the Fitness Institute of Texas at the University of Texas at Austin. Sulforaphane also may be able to prevent or reverse damage to blood vessel linings caused by chronic blood sugar problems and inflammation.
  • Watermelon: Watermelon contains lycopene, a cellular inhibitor for various inflammatory processes. It also works as an antioxidant to neutralize free radicals. Additionally, watermelon contains choline, which helps keep chronic inflammation down, according to a 2006 article published in Shock medical journal.
  • Walnuts and other nuts: Jimenez said that these are another great source of omega-3 fatty acids.
  • Onions: Their anti-inflammatory properties have made them a popular home remedy for asthma for centuries. Onions are a good source of quercetin, which inhibits histamines known to cause inflammation, according Jimenez.
  • Whole grains: Whole grains like brown rice, quinoa and bulgur wheat have been associated with decreased CRP levels, according to studies in the journal Molecular Nutrition & Food Research and in the Journal of Nutrition. Another study in the Journal of Nutrition found that people who ate fewer whole grains actually had higher inflammation markers. The fiber in whole grains can help mediate inflammatory processes by helping with weight loss and feeding beneficial gut bacteria associated with lower levels of inflammation, according to the Arthritis Foundation.
  • Certain spicesThe University of Wisconsin lists ginger, rosemary, turmeric, oregano, cayenne, cloves and nutmeg as possessing anti-inflammatory compounds that inhibit the biochemical process of inflammation.
  • Raisins: Berries are bright, shiny, and famously chock-full of free radical–fighting antioxidants, but as you stock up on the blue-and-red beauties, keep in mind that their wrinkly relative, the raisin, can also keep inflammation in check. “Snacking on raisins, and other fruit in general, tends to reduce a marker of inflammation known as TNF-alpha,” says Jim Painter, PhD, RD, a professor at Eastern Illinois University.
  • Soy: Beans in general are great sources of anti-inflammatory botanical compounds known as phytonutrients, but soy has been singled out by researchers for its ability to reduce the inflammation marker C-reactive protein, says Wendy Bazilian, DrPH, RD, author of The SuperfoodsRx Diet. This is great news for your heart—high levels of C-reactive protein have been linked to coronary artery disease. Another bean benefit: the protein-rich, satisfying legumes are good candidates to displace pro-inflammatory meat in meals. (But make sure your soy is organic, non-GMO.)
  • Salmon: Salmon may be pricier than most four-legged meat options, but it’s a notoriously good source of omega-3 fatty acids. It also bests plant-based sources of the nutrient, which your body can’t process as well. But you don’t need to make it the main event at every meal. In fact, all you really need to do is aim to minimize your ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids. “Just a fifth of a teaspoon of fish oil to a teaspoon of omega-3 fatty acids a day is the amount you need to bring your fat consumption into balance,” Painter says.
  • Ginger: This spicy root has gained a following for its nausea-calming powers, but it has another trick up its sleeve—inflammation crushing. Studies have linked the root to lowered post-exercise inflammation and a drop in joint pain caused by the chronic inflammatory conditions osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. While researchers haven’t pinpointed its anti-inflammatory effects to a single component, it’s likely one of the culprits is the plant’s active compound gingerol, Bazilian says.
  • Sweet Potato: Nutrient-packed sweet potatoes are great news for your heart, skin, and immune heath, but bad news for inflammation markers. “Foods high in the vitamins C and E and the carotenoids, alpha- and beta-carotene, like sweet potatoes, are anti-inflammatory,” Rosenbloom says. And they’re not the only orange food you should load up on; pumpkins, cantaloupe, apricots, and carrots are also good sources of carotenoids and vitamins.
  • Cherries: One fruit that stands out from the pack is the tart cherry. Like berries, the fleshy fruit abounds in anthocyanins (a type of phytonutrient), but it also delivers a uniquely powerful dose of anti-inflammatory compounds. “Tart cherries contain higher levels of both anthocyanins 1 and 2,” Bazilian explains. If that sounds a little technical, just think of it this way—you’re getting a double whammy of inflammation-fighting ingredients.
  • Kale: Along with fellow cruciferous vegetables arugula, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, bok choy, and wasabi, kale is rich in sulfur, which forces your liver to put it through two detox cycles, instead of one. That may sound like a pain, but it’s actually beneficial: The second run-through stimulates your body to churn out more phase II enzymes, which break down toxins in the same way your digestive enzymes break down food. “Phase II enzymes help clean your body out by reducing the toxic load,” says Painter.
  • Walnuts: You’d be hard-pressed to find a nut without anti-inflammatory benefits, but walnuts have managed to earn the spotlight in this category. “Walnuts have the highest concentration of plant-based omega-3s, more than 10 antioxidant phytonutrients, and polyphenols that also play a role in reducing inflammation,” Bazilian says.
  • Tea: You can even battle inflammation between meals by sipping on green, white, and black teas, Rosenbloom says. They’re steeped in free radical-fighting catechins, a polyphenolic compound found in the leaves of the Camellia sinesis plant. The more antioxidants you’re taking in, the better. “It’s best to adopt a diet rich in foods that are anti-inflammatory instead of concentrating on one or two superfoods,” she says.

 

To help you even further, I took recipes from Prevention.com that help to soothe inflammation and have included them below. Enjoy!

Amaranth Porridge

amaranth porridge600x450

SERVINGS: 2

⅔ c whole-grain amaranth
2 c filtered water
¼ c hemp or pumpkin seeds
1 Tbsp raw honey
1 tsp cinnamon
½ c blueberries or dried cranberries (apple juice sweetened)
1 med pear, chopped

1. COMBINE the amaranth and water in a skillet with a tight-fitting lid. Amaranth’s sticky consistency calls for a cast-iron or titanium surface to minimize heavy cleanup. If you don’t have a natural nonstick skillet, you can use a heavy 2-quart saucepan, but make sure to stir the porridge frequently to avoid sticking.
2. BRING to a boil, cover, and turn down to low heat. Simmer for 25 to 30 minutes, stirring once every 10 minutes to ensure the grains don’t stick to the pot, until the liquid is completely absorbed.
4. REMOVE from heat and add the seeds, raw honey, and cinnamon, stirring well. Divide the hot cereal between two bowls (or put one portion in a sealable container for the next day), and top with blueberries and pear.

NUTRITION (per serving) 460 cal, 17 g pro, 73 g carb, 14 g fiber, 22 g sugars, 12 g fat, 2 g sat fat, 20 mg sodium

Recipe by Julie Daniluk

 

Krispy Kale Chips

krispy kale chips600x450

SERVINGS: 8

2 bunches green curly kale (20 c), washed, large stems removed, torn into bite-sized pieces
1 c fresh cashews, soaked 2 hours
1 c sweet potato, grated
1 lemon, juiced
2 Tbsp nutritional yeast
1 Tbsp raw honey
½ tsp gray sea salt or pink rock salt
2 Tbsp filtered water

1. PLACE the kale in a large mixing bowl.
2. PROCESS remaining ingredients in a blender or food processor until smooth.
3. POUR over kale and mix thoroughly with your hands to coat the kale. (You want this mixture to be really glued on the kale.)
4. PLACE kale onto unbleached parchment paper, set your oven to 150 degrees and dehydrate for 2 hours. At one point, turn over leaves to ensure even drying.
5. REMOVE and store in an airtight container. Makes about 8 cups.

NUTRITION (per serving) 190 cal, 11 g pro, 26 g carb, 5 g fiber, 4 g sugars, 8 g fat, 1.5 g sat fat, 200 mg sodium

Recipe by Julie Daniluk

(You can also try our Sour Cream & Onion Kale Chips)

 

Beet the Detox Salad

beet salad600x450

SERVINGS: 4

1 lg beet, coarsely grated
1 lg carrot, coarsely grated
1 lg apple, diced
2 Tbsp almonds, chopped
2 Tbsp flax, hemp, perilla, or pumpkin seed oil
2 Tbsp lemon juice
4 c mixed greens
Optional additions:
2 Tbsp fresh dill or parsely, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/4 tsp gray sea salt or pink rock salt

1.TOSS all ingredients, except for the mixed greens, together in a large bowl. Mix in optional additions if using. You can make the dressing up to 2 days in advance and refrigerate.
2. DIVIDE mixed greens between 4 plates and top with apple mixture.

NUTRITION (per serving) 130 cal, 2 g pro, 12 g carb, 4 g fiber, 8 g sugars, 9 g fat, 1 g sat fat, 40 mg sodium

Recipe by Julie Daniluk

 

Cinnamon Baked Apples

cinnamon baked apples600x450
SERVINGS: 4

½ c various nuts and/or seeds
¼ c dried cranberries (apple juice sweetened)
2 dates, pitted and chopped
1 tsp grated fresh ginger root
1 tsp cinnamon
½ tsp nutmeg
¼ tsp ground cloves
4 apples
¼ c unpasteurized liquid honey
1 c apple juice or cider

1. PREHEAT the oven to 325°F degrees.
2. MIX nuts or seeds, cranberries, dates, ginger root, and spices in a bowl.
3. DON’T peel the apples, since most of the fiber and nutrients are in the skin. Being careful not to cut through the bottom of the apple, cut out the core.
4. STUFF each apple with the nut/seed mixture, then drizzle with honey and place in an 8 x 8 inch square baking dish.
5. POUR the juice around the fruit to keep it moist.
6. BAKE for 30 to 35 minutes, until the fruit is soft. Serve warm.

NUTRITION (per serving) 350 cal, 4 g pro, 69 g carb, 7 g fiber, 56 g sugars, 10 g fat, 1.5 g sat fat, 5 mg sodium

Recipe by Julie Daniluk

 

Kale Salad

kale salad600x450

SERVINGS: 4

6 c dinosaur kale, chopped
½ lemon
Pinch of dried basil
Pinch of gray sea salt or pink rock salt
1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive or chia, flax, or hemp seed oil
2 Tbsp red onion, minced
2 Tbsp green onion, chopped (about 1 whole onion)
1 sm cucumber, thinly sliced
1 garlic clove, minced
¼ c chopped kalamata olives

1. WASH kale and cut into small strips.
2. LIGHTLY steam the kale for 5 to 7 minutes in a steamer basket. Transfer to a large bowl and add lemon, basil, salt, and oil. Toss.
3. ADD the remaining ingredients and mix well.

NUTRITION (per serving) 150 cal, 5 g pro, 13 g carb, 3 g fiber, 1 g sugars, 10 g fat, 1 g sat fat, 490 mg sodium

Recipe by Julie Daniluk

 

Raw Pad Thai

raw pad thai600x450

SERVINGS: 4

1 med zucchini
1 lg carrot
1 green onion, chopped
½ c shredded purple cabbage
½ c cauliflower florets
½ c mung bean sprouts or radish sprouts (spicy)
Sauce:
2 Tbsp tahini
2 Tbsp almond butter
1 Tbsp lime or lemon juice
2 Tbsp tamari (wheat-free)
1 Tbsp raw honey
¼ tsp garlic, minced
½ tsp ginger root, grated

1. USE a mandoline or vegetable peeler to create noodles from the carrots and zucchini. Place them in a large mixing bowl and top with the vegetables.
2. WHISK sauce ingredients in a bowl. The sauce will be thick, but will thin out after it’s mixed with the vegetables.
3. POUR the sauce over the noodles and vegetables, and toss. This dish tastes even better the next day once the flavors have had a chance to blend.

NUTRITION (per serving) 140 cal, 6 g pro, 14 g carb, 3 g fiber, 8 g sugars, 9 g fat, 1 g sat fat, 510 mg sodium

Recipe by Julie Daniluk

Sources

http://www.organiclifestylemagazine.com/issue/15-what-causes-chronic-inflammation-and-how-to-stop-it-for-good

http://scdlifestyle.com/2012/10/chronic-inflammation-signs-symptoms-and-testing/

http://www.livescience.com/52344-inflammation.html

http://www.prevention.com/food/food-remedies/10-foods-that-help-fight-inflammation

Free Franco DeNicola Screening: The Shift In Consciousness

We interviewed Franco DeNicola about what is happening with the shift in consciousness. It turned out to be one of the deepest and most important information we pulled out within an interview.

We explored why things are moving a little more slowly with the shift at times, what is stopping certain solutions from coming forward and the important role we all play.

Watch the interview here.
Advertisement
advertisement - learn more

Awareness

Boy or Girl – Baby Gender Selection Issues

Published

on

Some parents have the possibility to opt for gender selection; however, being able to decide whether to have a baby boy or girl is a controversial issue.

Many couples expecting a baby do not think it’s a big issue whether they have a boy or a girl; however there are several medical, social, and personal reasons that could influence parents to recur to some form of gender selection.

Like many other controversial practices, the legality of gender selection, also known as sex selection, varies from country to country.

The Legality of Baby Gender Selection

The United States has perhaps some of the most relaxed laws regarding baby gender selection in the world. Most European countries and Australia, on the other hand, have bans on sex selection and only allow it for medical reasons. For example, if a parent is a carrier of a mutation or gene with more chances of manifesting itself in a certain gender, baby gender selection is valid. However, if parents simply wish to balance the ratio of boys and girls in their family, they are not allowed to recur to sex selection.

This has generated a form of medical tourism in which couples from countries where gender selection is illegal, like the UK, travel to the US in order to be able to choose whether to have a baby boy or girl.

On the other hand, sex selection is illegal in the two most populated countries on Earth, China and India. In these countries, baby gender selection has been performed clandestinely for many years and for reasons other than family balancing or avoiding genetic diseases. In these societies, having a baby boy is preferred mainly for cultural and economic reasons. Parents believe that boys have better chances of earning income and eventually support them when they reach an old age.

advertisement - learn more

Methods of Baby Gender Selection

There are two major types of gender selection methods: the first one is called sperm sorting, and involves separating X-chromosome sperm from Y-chromosome sperm by flow cytometry, a purification technique in which chromosomes are suspended in a stream of sperm and identified by an electronic detector before being separated. Intra-uterine insemination or in-vitro fertilization can then be performed with the enriched sperm. The success rates for this method vary from 80% to 93%.

The other method, called pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, consists in generating several embryos through in-vitro fertilization, which are then genetically tested to determine a baby’s gender. The chosen embryos can then be implanted. This method has a success rate of almost 100%; however, it can be quite expensive, costing up to $15,000.

Issues Regarding Baby Gender Selection

While there are few objections against baby gender selection when it is performed for medical reasons, it has become a highly controversial issue when it is used for balancing the number of boys or girls in families. Some people raise the obvious ethical question of whether people who opt for gender selection are “playing God” by manipulating whether to have a baby boy or girl. Others believe that new parents will raise a baby more appropriately if he or she belongs to their preferred gender.

Gender Imbalance Caused by Baby Gender Selection

Gender selection has caused demographic concern in China and India since it has contributed to generate a gender imbalance in the populations of those countries. In some regions of China, for example, the sex ratio for newborns is 118:100, boys to girls. This phenomenon has in turn been associated with social problems such as an increase in violence and prostitution.

It seems like a logical solution for governments around the globe to legalize baby gender selection but to analyze the personal reasons why each couple intends to select a baby boy or girl. Gender selection for medical reasons should even be encouraged, since it could prevent serious genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis, Huntington’s disease, and Haemophilia A. Balancing the gender ratio of a family should be accepted if by doing this, a healthy family environment is created. On the other hand, China and India have shown that baby gender selection as a result of a bias towards a particular gender can not only create a gender imbalance in the population, but contribute to social problems as well.

Free Franco DeNicola Screening: The Shift In Consciousness

We interviewed Franco DeNicola about what is happening with the shift in consciousness. It turned out to be one of the deepest and most important information we pulled out within an interview.

We explored why things are moving a little more slowly with the shift at times, what is stopping certain solutions from coming forward and the important role we all play.

Watch the interview here.
Continue Reading

Awareness

Organic Certification: What the USDA Organic Label Means

Published

on

In Brief

  • The Facts:

    Organic and natural labels mean different things, and various types of labels tells you what percentage of ingredients are actually organic. We'll explore what to look for.

  • Reflect On:

    Do you sometimes buy products thinking they are organic or fully natural based on their wording? Have you later found out that those products aren't natural or organic at all? Read labels more closely at grocery stores to be aware.

Don’t get conned by fraudulent claims of “natural” or “organic.” Learn what to look for, and why it’s important, to ensure you’re getting the quality you are paying for.

The industrial age of the 20th century brought about changing agricultural practices that have generated increasing alarm about the effects of these practices on the environment and health. The use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, antibiotics, hormones, irradiated and genetically altered food and fiber products has created a groundswell of rightful concern. It has led to the growing demand for non-toxic, organic products that many are willing to pay a higher price for to ensure the healthful purity of food and clothing provided for their families.

With such profit opportunities, it’s little wonder that the lucrative organic product market has suffered abuse with so-called “organic” labels being fraudulently placed on products that have not earned the right. As a result of pressure from farming and consumer groups, legislation for the standardization of organic certification was introduced in the 1980s. It has been updated to include more vigorous enforcement and control methods since, with the current standards established in 2002 by the USDA.

The Standards of USDA Organic Certification

Specific standards must be met in order to legally claim a product as USDA certified organic. Organic producers must utilize methods that conserve water, maximize soil health, and reduce air pollution. The specific standards to earn USDA organic certification include:

Free of synthetic chemicals such as insecticides, herbicides, fertilizers, hormones, antibiotics, and additives

Free from irradiation and genetically modified organisms

advertisement - learn more

Agricultural products grown on land that has been free of prohibited substances for a period of three years

Animals used for meat, eggs, milk or other animal products must be exclusively fed foods that are organically grown, may not be given antibiotics or hormones, and must have access to outdoors.

Clean and sanitized harvesting and processing equipment throughout the process from harvest to finished, packaged product

Detailed chain-of-handling records from the field through final sales

Physical separation of certified organic products from non-organic products throughout the process of production

Regular on-site inspections from USDA-approved inspectors to ensure compliance

Understanding the Certified Organic Label

Once the rigorous process of certification has been completed, organic producers may place the USDA certified organic seal on their products. Currently, there are four levels of certified organic products, with a specific definition of the percentage of organic ingredients the final products contains. They are as follows:

• 100% organic: all production methods and ingredients are USDA certified organic.

• Organic: at least 95% of the production methods and ingredients are USDA certified organic with remaining ingredients included on the National List of allowed ingredients.

• Made With Organic Ingredients: at least 70% of the ingredients are USDA certified organic with remaining ingredients included on the National List of allowed ingredients.

• No organic wording or seal: less than 70% of the ingredients are USDA certified organic and no claims may be made on the front or back of the product.

Manufacturers or producers who knowingly label a product “organic” when it does not meet the USDA standards are subject to fines up to $11,000 per violation.

Why Organic Certification is Important

When you see the official USDA organic certification seal on food, clothing, and bedding products, you can be assured that these products have met the meticulous standards required and are free of chemicals, toxins, antibiotics, and hormones. When you see the USDA certified organic label, you will understand the value of the higher priced organic products as compared to non-organically produced products.

With the current stringent organic certification requirements enforced by regular inspections from USDA accredited agents, the USDA certified organic label has great meaning and importance to the consumer. Look for the label to know that you are getting the quality you are paying for.

Free Franco DeNicola Screening: The Shift In Consciousness

We interviewed Franco DeNicola about what is happening with the shift in consciousness. It turned out to be one of the deepest and most important information we pulled out within an interview.

We explored why things are moving a little more slowly with the shift at times, what is stopping certain solutions from coming forward and the important role we all play.

Watch the interview here.
Continue Reading

Awareness

WHO Finds Global Lack Of Inactivity Rising Especially In Wealthier Countries — What You Can Do

Published

on

In Brief

  • The Facts:

    Inactivity is on the rise and it's the cause of a wide range of health concerns. Our population is only becoming more inactive, not less, and it's time to change that.

  • Reflect On:

    There are many factors of our modern world that make us less active. Our jobs, driving rather than walking/biking, too much screen time. What can you do differently to bring more activity into your life? What story stops you from starting?

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that more than a quarter of the entire population on this planet are not getting enough physical exercise, this number has barely improved since 2001. There are many factors that contribute to this, but just how much damage are we doing by failing to be active?

The lack of physical exercise raises the risk of many health problems, such as heart disease, type-2 diabetes and various types of cancers.

Interestingly, according to their study published in The Lancet Global Health, higher income countries, such as the UK, were among the least active population. Women were also found to be more sedentary throughout the world, excluding two regions in Asia.

The study looked at self-reported data on activity levels from 358 population based surveys covering 168 countries and included 1.9 million people.

The populations of higher income countries, which include the UK and USA showed an increase in the proportion of inactive people and had actually risen from 32% in 2001 to 37% in 2016, in the lower income countries it remained at 16%.

Those who were classified as inactive did less than 150 minutes of moderate exercise and around 75 minutes of intense activity per week.

advertisement - learn more

It was found that women were less active than men overall, except for in South and Central Asia, the Middle East, North Africa and higher-income Western countries. The authors believe that this was caused by a few different factors including extra childcare duties and cultural perspectives that may have made it more difficult for them to exercise.

Why More Inactivity In Wealthier Countries?

According to the researchers, in the wealthier countries, many of the jobs have transitioned to more office or desk jobs, meaning a more sedentary type of lifestyle. On top of that much of the population of these countries drive automobiles or take public transit to and from work which in many cases accounts for a lot of their time.

In the lower income countries, many of the jobs require the people to be more active, are physically demanding and people often have to walk to and from their jobs.

The WHO has had a goal to reduce the global levels of inactivity by 10% by 2025, the authors of the study feel that at the rate we are currently going, this target will be missed.

Lead author of the study, Dr. Regina Guthold said, “Unlike other major global health risks, levels of insufficient physical activity are not falling worldwide, on average, and over a quarter of all adults are not reaching the recommended levels of physical activity for good health.”

Regions with increasing levels of insufficient physical activity are a major concern for public health and the prevention and control of non-communicable diseases.”

Co-author, Dr. Fiona Bull added, “Addressing these inequalities in physical activity levels between men and women will be critical to achieving global activity targets and will require interventions to promote and improve women’s access to opportunities that are safe, affordable and culturally acceptable.”

According to the WHO,

Exercise guidelines for 19- to 64-year-olds

How much?

  • at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity every week
  • strength exercises on two or more days a week that work all the major muscles
  • break up long periods of sitting with light activity

What is moderate aerobic activity?

  • Walking fast, water aerobics, riding a bike on level ground or with a few hills, doubles tennis, pushing a lawn mower, hiking, skateboarding, rollerblading, volleyball, basketball

What counts as vigorous activity?

  • Jogging or running, swimming fast, riding a bike fast or on hills, singles tennis, football, rugby, skipping rope, hockey, aerobics, gymnastics, martial arts

What activities strengthen muscles?

  • lifting weights, working with resistance bands, doing exercises that use your own body weight, such as push-ups and sit-ups, heavy gardening, such as digging and shovelling, yoga

What activities are both aerobic and muscle-strengthening?

  • circuit training, aerobics, running, football, rugby, netball, hockey

Final Thoughts

I was surprised to see that the WHO didn’t touch on inactivity due to too much screen time — watching television, Netflix, Facebook scrolling, messaging, texting, browsing etc. Certainly, the increase in screen time plays a roll with the amount of inactivity, especially in the higher income countries. If you are someone who spends too much time staring at a screen, then it is important to consider the above information. Can you limit your screen time and replace it with something active? Or would you consider jumping rope, or rebounding while watching the television? Our health is our greatest wealth and having awareness about an issue is the first way to create change and take responsibility for our lives.

Could you walk or bike to work instead of drive? What about trying a new sport? Could you commit to adding a few hours each week of physical activity? These small decisions could have a profound impact on your health, longevity and overall well-being.

Much Love

Free Franco DeNicola Screening: The Shift In Consciousness

We interviewed Franco DeNicola about what is happening with the shift in consciousness. It turned out to be one of the deepest and most important information we pulled out within an interview.

We explored why things are moving a little more slowly with the shift at times, what is stopping certain solutions from coming forward and the important role we all play.

Watch the interview here.
Continue Reading
advertisement - learn more
advertisement - learn more

Video

EL