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20 Healthy Weight Loss Techniques That Are Actually Science-Backed

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Eat this. Stay away from that.

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We hear it a lot in the weight loss industry, as each idea turns into a program that turns into a trend. But let’s be honest: How often do we think about diet fads that have come and gone and shake our heads that they were EVER a real thing? This industry is full of ridiculous myths. Based on profit, many aren’t out to help you slim down the healthy, correct way, but rather to take your money by any means possible.

If you’re trying to lose weight, you might find these science-backed strategies to be more truthful, and in turn, more effective, than anything you’ve succumbed to before.

1. Drink Plenty Of Water

Drinking water works to increase metabolic rate by 24-30 percent over a period of 1-1.5 hours. This can, in turn, allow you to burn more calories (1, 2).

2. Fill Up On Eggs In The Morning

Eating whole eggs over a grain-based breakfast has been linked to consuming fewer calories, more weight loss, and a lower body fat percentage (4, 5).

3. Enjoy A (Black) Cup Of Coffee

There has been a lot of controversy surrounding coffee, but it should be noted that it comes with plenty of antioxidants and a plethora of health benefits. Research has even shown that the caffeine in coffee can boost metabolism by 3-11 percent, while also increasing fat burning by 10-29 percent (6, 7, 8).

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4. Drink Green Tea

Green tea is loaded with catechins, which are powerful antioxidants that are thought to work in unison with caffeine to increase fat burning (9, 10).

5. Replace Your Cooking Fats With Coconut Oil

Rich in medium chain triglycerides, coconut oil has been shown to increase metabolic rate by 120 calories per day, all the while reducing your calorie intake by 256 calories per day (13, 14).

6. Get Rid Of Added Sugar

It’s become common knowledge that added sugar is the main culprit behind weight gain in the modern diet. Along with high fructose corn syrup, added sugar is associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and more (17, 18, 19).

7.  Minimize Your Refined Carbs Intake

Unlike good-for-you complex carbs, which are full of natural fiber, refined carbs are typically sugar, or grains that have been stripped of their nutritious attributes. Research links refined carbs to obesity, as they cause a rapid spike in blood sugar, which can cause hunger and cravings for more refined carbs (20, 21, 22).

8. Keep A Food Diary

Along with portion control and counting calories, studies have concluded that keeping a food diary, in which you record exactly what you eat, leads to weight loss success (28, 29).

9. Keep Healthy Food On Hand When Hunger Strikes

When you become hungry, you may typically become desperate for the first thing that will satisfy you. Often times that can be an unhealthy choice like processed snacks. Try keeping only healthy foods on hand in order to prevent yourself from eating empty calories. Whole fruits, a handful of nuts, raw veggies, and yogurt are all great options to consider.

10. Eat Foods With Capsaicin

Capsaicin — often found in spicy foods like cayenne pepper — is a compound that can increase metabolic rate and decrease your appetite (30, 31).

11. Do Some Cardio

Doing aerobic exercise is a surefire way to burn calories while improving both your physical and mental wellbeing. Research has found it to be an effective tool for losing belly fat, too (32, 33).

12. Do Resistance Exercises

A big downside to dieting is the loss of muscle and the reduction of metabolism. To prevent this, try lifting weights, which studies link to a higher metabolism, and the prevention of loss of muscle mass (36, 37).

13. Eat Plenty Of Fiber

Fiber, specifically viscous fiber, has been found by research to increase satiety and aid in weight control (38, 39).

14. Load Up On Veggies and Fruits

Many vegetables and fruits are full of water, and are lower energy density foods, which means they provide less energy per gram of food, allowing you to eat more without consuming too many calories. Studies show that people who eat them regularly tend to weigh less as well  (40).

15. Slow Down Your Chewing

Ever felt like you scarf down so much food, but still feel hungry? You may find yourself overeating, only to be met with an uncomfortable feeling of fullness soon after. That’s because it takes time for the brain to register that your body no longer needs any more nourishment. Research has found that chewing slower can help you to consume fewer calories, as well as increase the production of hormones that are linked to weight loss (41, 42).

16. Get Quality Sleep

Whoever said sleep is for the weak didn’t take one’s health into consideration (something you need to live at your best). Research shows that poor sleep is among the biggest factors for falling victim to obesity. It is linked to an 89 percent increase of obesity among children, and 55 percent among adults (43).

17. Beat Your Food Addiction

Addiction seems to be a heavy word in our society for obvious reasons, but don’t underestimate your health issues in this regard. If you have food cravings that overtake your mind, causing you to spiral out of control and eat far too much food beyond nourishment and enjoyment, then you might be a food addict. A 2014 study found that 19.9 percent of people meet the food addiction criteria (44).

18. Eat More Protein

Consuming a diet high in protein has been found to increase metabolic rate by 80 to 100 calories per day, while improving satiety, resulting in you eating up to 441 fewer calories per day (45, 46, 47).

19. Don’t Drink Your Calories

While we’ve come to the conclusion that eating sugar is bad, drinking it has proven to be even worse. Studies show that liquid sugar calories may be the most fattening part of the modern diet (50). This means steer clear of sugar soda and fruit juices.

20. Eat Whole Foods

Diets often forget one very important factor: overall health.

Many offer quick fixes to slim down, without allowing a regimen for people to change their overall lifestyle to a healthier one. If you want to be leaner and healthier, eat whole, single ingredient foods, which are naturally filling.

H/t: https://authoritynutrition.com/

Free Franco DeNicola Screening: The Shift In Consciousness

We interviewed Franco DeNicola about what is happening with the shift in consciousness. It turned out to be one of the deepest and most important information we pulled out within an interview.

We explored why things are moving a little more slowly with the shift at times, what is stopping certain solutions from coming forward and the important role we all play.

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Lifestyle

My Month Wearing Blue Light Blocking Glasses & Why I Believe You Should Consider Them

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In Brief

  • The Facts:

    While the research behind blue light's potential negative impact on us is considered limited by many in the scientific community, the major area it is believed to impact is our sleep -and there are several studies to support it.

  • Reflect On:

    How much time do you spend daily engaging with blue light emitting technology like phones, laptops, etc? Could you benefit from investing in something that could help to mitigate its potential negative long-term impact on you?

As my life currently stands, the nature of my work as a social media consultant requires me to spend between 8-14 hours per day staring at an electronic device. Whether I’m creating ad units, engaging with audiences or scheduling out content, pretty well everything I do to provide for myself involves me and a screen.

While I’d love to think that I’m an anomaly when it comes to my relationship with technology, that is certainly not the case, as a recent MIT Technology article revealed, the average American spends 24 hours per week online. To some, the idea of spending just 1 out of 7 days in a week online doesn’t seem that daunting, but the number soars substantially higher when you factor in time spent in front of technology in general -including non-online work, television, etc.

Knowing that my work requirements were not on the cusp of changing in the very near future, I decided to do something about it. I chose to invest $20 of my hard earned money on a pair of blue light blocking glasses, designed to cut out approximately 90% of the blue light hitting my eyes.

While the research behind blue light’s potential negative impact on us is considered limited and arguable by many in the scientific community, the major area it is believed to impact is our sleep.

There are a handful of studies that have been conducted, with one of the most widely recognized being a study conducted on 20 adults where it was concluded that those given blue light blocking eyewear experienced a significant improvement in sleep quality. As someone who cherishes my sleep and knows how poorly I can function without a proper night’s rest, this was enough to spark my curiosity.

So I decided to purchase these glasses off of Amazon, and have been wearing them every day that I’ve been home (which has been approximately 90% of the time) from 8PM onwards for the past month.

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Here are my 5 key takeaways from my experience in both written and video form:

1. They Have Improved How Quickly I’ve Been Able To Fall Asleep At Night

As someone, who like so many others, has been blessed with a mind that loves to become most active with random thoughts, ideas and concerns just as I’m trying to fall asleep, the biggest area of improvement for me was in how much quicker I was able to fall asleep at night.

Of course, there is the potential for other factors (including the placebo effect) to play a role in this experience, but I can confidently say that for the most part there were no other significant changes in my life. My days were just as long as they were before, and I regularly felt the same level of fatigue I  felt prior to beginning this experiment that my mind would previously plow through in its efforts to keep me up.

This factor alone was more than enough to extend my interest in making blue light blocking glasses a regular part of my life.

2. They Are An Inexpensive Way To Be Proactive About Our Health

We live in a world where we as a collective largely choose to be reactive rather than proactive about our health. Rather than eating healthy, staying active and providing our body with the rest it regularly needs to rejuvenate itself, we opt to wait until we’re hit in the face with an issue or health condition before we do anything about it.

Even though we don’t fully know the extent to how damaging substantial blue light exposure is to our health (especially not in the long-term), we do know that the potential exists. So rather than waiting for the jury to deliver its verdict, why not choose to be proactive about guarding yourself against it, mitigating the chances that if it does prove to be detrimental, that you are part of the group that helped them determine that?

3. They Made Me More Consciously Aware Of My Technology Addiction

For most of us, myself included, technology has become so engrained within our lives that we don’t even process how much time we spend interacting with it. Whether it be due to the nature of our work, or our sheer addiction to Facebook, Instagram or texting with our friends, there are probably few things in your life that you are more attached to than your phone and computer.

One unexpected factor that integrating blue light blocking glasses provided me with is that they made me more aware of my technology addiction by adding in that extra step. Since wearing them was a new experience for me, it heightened my conscious presence with everything that I did while wearing them. It was through this that I realized just how scary my addiction can be at times and just how critical it is that I am doing something about it.

4. We’re Exposed To A Lot More Blue Light Than We Likely Think

While blue light is naturally emitted from sources such as the sun, it is also emitted from a lot more than you likely think. The biggest surprise to most is that in addition to coming off your phones, televisions and computers, blue light is also emitted from what is rapidly becoming the most common form of artificial light: LEDs.

So whether your house and workspace are fully retrofitted or just partly retrofitted with LED lighting, why not take a step to protect yourself against what is only going to become more and more prevalent due to its energy efficiency?

5. They Are A Positive Step On A Much Bigger Issue

I’ve already alluded to it throughout this article, but the biggest takeaway from my blue light blocking experience is that they are a positive step on something we all need to acknowledge and correct: our technology addiction. There are a million reasons (and growing) for us all to love our smartphones as much as we do, but we also know that our addiction to them is not sustainable.

I’m a firm believer that we are all being sold on the illusion of greater connection through technology, while in reality we are more disconnected from one another than ever before. So if it takes some blue light blocking glasses to start the conversation on how serious our screen addiction may be, I’m all for it!


Ready to change your life today? Get FREE access to download a copy of my eBook on ‘5 Quick Daily Hacks for a GENUINELY Happier Life’ by signing up here.

And for more brutally honest personal development content designed for those who actually want to change, be sure to subscribe to my YouTube Channel and to follow me on Facebook.

Free Franco DeNicola Screening: The Shift In Consciousness

We interviewed Franco DeNicola about what is happening with the shift in consciousness. It turned out to be one of the deepest and most important information we pulled out within an interview.

We explored why things are moving a little more slowly with the shift at times, what is stopping certain solutions from coming forward and the important role we all play.

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Lifestyle

1 % of the World’s Population Doesn’t Sleep Like Everybody Else – Are We Doing It Wrong?

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In Brief

  • The Facts:

    Professor Ying-Hui Fu of the University of California is the name behind the ongoing research on short sleepers. His work shows that there are natural born 'short sleepers' who function off of a few hours of sleep each day, as a result of genetics.

  • Reflect On:

    Are we sleeping correctly? We don’t all require the same amount of sleep. But the thing is, each one of needs to find their specific rhythm, and we’re much too constricted by society telling us. Consciousness plays a huge role, our own beliefs.

You’ve surely heard somewhere by now that Tesla slept only two hours each night, and Margaret Thatcher slept only four. And they’ve lived well into old age, and never seemed to have been stopped by daytime fatigue!

We marvel so often at famous geniuses, successful entrepreneurs, political leaders and others who’re known to thrive on less than 5 hours of sleep each night. We love to talk about it – doesn’t this make it obvious that we don’t, after all, need 7-10 hours of sleep per night? Did they have specific methods? Is there a direct correlation between their ingenuity and unusual habits?

But let’s leave the notion of history’s giants and their influence for a while – their prominence inevitably steers the discussion about sleep in another direction. The thing is, they don’t all actually fall into the same category regarding sleeping habits. While some relied on alternative sleep cycles or maybe forced themselves to adopt a certain sleeping schedule, others were, in fact, natural-born short-sleepers. There are people – regular, non-famous people just like me and you – who fall into this category as well.

The world of natural-born short sleepers

You’ve surely encountered plenty of people who get by with six or less hours of sleep each night. But while the majority of adults who sleep little actually have a sleeping disorder or are restricted by busy schedules, natural-born short sleepers are completely different.

They simply don’t have the need to sleep more than a few hours. They wake up refreshed and well-rested and they don’t experience daytime fatigue, whereas the majority of us would definitely feel shattered. They keep their sleeping schedule consistent even on weekends, rarely ever sleeping in – and none of it feels remotely like a burden to them. They’re simply guided by their biological clock.  

It’s fascinating to even imagine that someone can get by their entire life with approximately four hours of sleep each night, at their own will, and actually thrive and be entirely healthy. But there are people like that, and although this topic has gained interest in the scientific community fairly recently, it’s estimated that about 1% of the worldwide population are natural short-sleepers.

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Just how is this possible, you may ask?

What the research says

Professor Ying-Hui Fu of the University of California in San Francisco is the prominent name behind the ongoing research on short sleepers. She started examining the phenomenon back in 1996, when a woman reported to her that her entire family got by on only a few hours of sleep. Having seen that none of them suffered from insomnia or any other sleeping disorder, but on the contrary, woke up energetic at dawn and stayed that way throughout the day, Fu delved into the family’s genetics and expanded her research.

The result: Fu and her team of researchers discovered a mutation in the gene DEC2 among all the subjects who were short-sleepers, but the mutation wasn’t present among their family members who slept longer or among other unrelated participants.

Although more research needs to be conducted, it seems that we have an invaluable clue: being a short-sleeper is the result of a gene mutation. Essentially, our genes largely dictate how much sleep we need, and we don’t all require the same amount of sleep. But the thing is, each one of needs to find their specific rhythm, and we’re much too constricted by society’s views of what presents a “normal sleeping pattern”.

Do you wish you’d sleep less too?

Let’s not kid ourselves – you probably do. Even if you didn’t wish you’d get more done each day, spending more time awake would mean you could take things slowly. The problem is – we wish we’d be short-sleepers too, so we try and sleep less. But it doesn’t work; we’re fatigued and miserable, waiting for vacation so that we can cram in some decent sleep.

So instead of forcing ourselves to sleep less, let’s first try and find out how much sleep feels good to us. This is actually not that easy to determine, and not just because we don’t have the luxury to sleep in most of the time. It’s because the number of hours we sleep each night is affected by the quality of sleep.

With noise and light pollution being the major issues, the quality of our sleep is largely trumped, so we actually require more sleep than usual in order to get proper rest. If you want to determine how much sleep you actually need, focus on sleep hygiene first: wear a sleeping mask to align your circadian rhythm, ensure your bedroom is entirely quiet or wear earplugs, avoid electronics two hours before bedtime, calm your thoughts down, and so on.

It takes time and conscious practice, undoubtedly, but the truth is that we all need to pay much more attention to our sleep. And for the most part, we need to start ignoring all the jabber about when we’re supposed to go to bed and how much sleep we need. We’re not all the same and our collective knowledge about sleep is very poor actually. So if you’re eager for some experimentation, you can even try a different sleep cycle to sleep less and see the results for yourself (just do it responsibly, of course).

Lastly, let’s not forget that there are long-sleepers too – people who need more than 10 hours of sleep each night to function their best. Who knows, you might even fall into this category. It’s kind of a bummer because your days are literally shorter if you end up sleeping as much as you should. But let’s not look at it that way. We need to embrace our sleeping patterns, whichever they are, just as long as we’re positive that they’re the most natural and healthy to us. Forget the sleep recipes of various productivity gurus – find your rhythm and structure your day around it to maximize your time on Earth.

Free Franco DeNicola Screening: The Shift In Consciousness

We interviewed Franco DeNicola about what is happening with the shift in consciousness. It turned out to be one of the deepest and most important information we pulled out within an interview.

We explored why things are moving a little more slowly with the shift at times, what is stopping certain solutions from coming forward and the important role we all play.

Watch the interview here.
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Awareness

Tips On Overcoming Sleep Problems During Pregnancy

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Getting a Good Night’s Sleep in the Third Trimester is a Challenge

As the body changes, a pregnant woman may suddenly find a handful of reasons she can’t get to sleep at night. Try these tips for an uninterrupted night’s sleep.

A common complaint among pregnant women, particularly those in their third trimester, is the inability to fall (and stay) asleep at night. Many factors are often to blame, making it difficult to know exactly how to address the issue. From growing size to frequent urination, there seems to be no break for a rest. But some very basic techniques can help pregnant women get the sleep they need.

Why Can’t I Sleep?

As the body changes throughout the first and second trimesters, some women may notice changes in their sleeping pattern. Most, however, aren’t too affected until they reach month seven or so. As the body rapidly adapts to the growing baby, some issues may arise:

Frequent urination can be a huge annoyance. As the kidneys do double-duty to filter the increased blood volume (about 40% more than normal), the body produces more urine. At the same time, the baby’s growth has increased pressure on the bladder, making the time between bathroom trips very short. Babies active at night may also increase the number of trips for some mothers.

A rapid heartbeat is needed to pump that extra blood throughout the body, but some women find it difficult to relax in these circumstances.

Shortness of breath, due to pressure on the lungs and the release of certain hormones, can make it a challenge to fall asleep at night. As the fetus grows, the diaphragm will compress more and more, increasing the pressure on the lungs.

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Aches and pains are quite common, since a pregnant woman’s center of balance shifts and places extra pressure on new areas. Leg cramps and lower back pain are a typical night-time complaint since the hormone relaxin is working to stretch out and loosen the ligaments to prepare for delivery. Injuries and strains become more likely later in pregnancy.

Digestive problems, like heartburn and constipation, abound as the process of digestion slows down. Food backs up in the digestive tract, taking longer to break down, and the result is mom’s discomfort.

Get Comfortable

Doctors recommend that pregnant women lay on their side at night to allow proper blood flow throughout the body. For stomach- and back-sleepers this might be difficult, but it’s important. Choosing a comfortable mattress and pillows is a must as they will help make a pregnant woman more comfortable at night. Use pillows under the belly, behind the back, and between the legs. Try experimenting with different pillows (body pillows, wedges, etc.) and different positions.

Get Prepared

When it’s almost time to get to sleep, start preparing the body for bedtime. Take a relaxing bath, have a glass of warm mylk, or a night-time massage. Putting the mind at ease can help make the transition to sleep easier. For some, foods high in carbohydrates, like a snack of bread or crackers, will help with sleep troubles. And to limit bathroom trips, be sure to avoid drinking fluids too close to bedtime!

Get Healthy

The right nutrition and exercise can go a long way, especially during pregnancy. Certain things should be avoided and added to optimize sleep:

Adding calcium to the diet will help to curb those painful leg cramps.

Protein-rich diets can ward off those unpleasant pregnancy nightmares.

Skipping caffeine, or limiting it as much as possible, can have a dramatic effect. Many pregnant women’s bodies cannot break down caffeine, so it remains in the system much longer than usual.

Avoid foods that trigger heartburn.

Get enough fibre to reduce constipation.

Try yoga for relaxation, walks to keep joints limber and moderate activity to help promote sleep. Adding exercise every day might be the key to getting to bed at night.

Paying attention to the body, staying relaxed, and getting the right nutrition is essential to quieting the mind and getting a good night’s sleep during pregnancy. Follow these tips and try to stay positive; only a few more months (or weeks) to go!

Free Franco DeNicola Screening: The Shift In Consciousness

We interviewed Franco DeNicola about what is happening with the shift in consciousness. It turned out to be one of the deepest and most important information we pulled out within an interview.

We explored why things are moving a little more slowly with the shift at times, what is stopping certain solutions from coming forward and the important role we all play.

Watch the interview here.
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