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Quitting The Job You Hate: Four Reasons To Consider A Drastic Change In Your Life

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Take a moment and breathe. Place your hand over your chest area, near your heart. Breathe slowly into the area for about a minute, focusing on a sense of ease entering your mind and body. Click here to learn why we suggest this.

It’s time to quit that job you hate. You know it, I know it, your boss knows it. But maybe you’re having second thoughts. That’s okay — we’ll talk it out.

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People quit their jobs for all sorts of reasons, but what are yours?

--> Our latest podcast episode: Were humans created by extraterrestrials? Joe sits down with Bruce Fenton, multidisciplinary researcher and author to explore the fascinating evidence behind this question. Click here to listen!

You Only Stay at Your Job for the Paycheque

Don't Stay at a Job You Hate Just for the Paycheck

Maybe it actually started before you even took the job — you had rent due and bills to pay, not to mention your daily requirement for food. So sure, the job didn’t look glorious, but it was enough to pay your bills.

There’s no shame in staying at a job for the paycheque when you really need it, but that doesn’t mean you should stay there forever for that same reason. If you’re thinking about quitting the job you hate because it’s only worth the paycheque, then there are some real steps you can take toward moving on.

Start by honestly assessing how much you make each month, and exactly where all that money goes. Do you drive places you could walk or take public transit to instead? Do you go out several nights a week? Do you cook at home, or mostly eat out?

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Anywhere you can cut costs offers another opportunity to save — and you’ll need a healthy savings account to take a risk on switching to a new job without letting your bills fall behind.

Also, learning to live on less can help you be more flexible when vetting new jobs. You might not need to quit the next job you work at if you can choose one you love, rather than just one that pays well.

Your Job Doesn’t Prepare You For The Career You Want

Every job can be considered a stepping stone. Any experience looks good on a resume, though nobody will disagree that a job closer to your field will look even better. Before you quit that job you hate, assess whether it’s helping you get where you want, or holding you back.

Take an honest look at where you want to be in five or ten years, then ask yourself, “Will the people I want to be working with in the future see the value in the job I’m holding now?” You might not have the experience, education, or skills to land your dream job today, but that doesn’t mean you should be killing time instead of trying to get as close as you can.

For many skilled trades, this can mean finding someone to apprentice under  easy if you’re a plumber or a carpenter. But if your career path is something more formal like becoming a doctor, why not hunt down a job working the desk or back office at someone’s private practice? You’ll not only pick up some great skills working with someone in your field, but you’ll have experience that will set you apart from others seeking similar work.

If you’re hoping to do something more nuanced with your life, just look at the person most like who you want to become yourself. What jobs did they hold when they were younger? Who works under them or around them?

Every small step you can take closer to the future you want will reveal opportunities you could never have dreamed of, and a job that you’ll never want to quit.

You Aren’t Utilizing Your Best Skills

Pencil

It’s not always just about being prepared for the future — you have real skills today that can help you shine. If the job you hate isn’t letting you use those, you might have a very good reason to quit.

Nobody masters everything, but most people have certain innate abilities that set them apart. If you can’t be working your dream job, and you can’t be working a job directly on your career path, at least try to find a job that lets you excel.

By flexing your best skills, you’ll be able to impress everyone you work with, leaving you with glowing recommendations and great opportunities for promotions and raises. This may not be your ideal job now, but those opportunities might lead you to a position you love more than the job you thought you wanted, because of the skills you’re mastering.

Your Job Has Left You Shackled to a Life You Hate

Shackled to a Job You Hate

One of the most difficult things to admit is that it’s not the job itself you hate, but the life you have to lead because of it. This can be because of your location, your coworkers, your hours, the pay, or any number of factors, but let’s face it — you just aren’t happy.

This is another problem that requires you to take a hard look at your finances. More than just quitting a job you hate, you might be in need of a drastic life change, and that requires a lot of planning and saving to handle gracefully.

Spend some time dreaming up the life you want  where you’d live, how you’d spend your time, what your job would look like, what kind of people you would want to be around — and then ask yourself the hard questions about what it would take to get those things.

Quitting the job you hate might be difficult, but if you can create a plan for getting the life you want, it might be the best thing you could ever do.

The Challenge of Moving Forward

The more you look at what you have to do to take control of your life and quit the job you hate, the more daunted you may begin to feel. If you find yourself wondering, “How am I going to figure this all out on my own?” feel assured that you aren’t alone.

This article is only the start. I told you that I wanted to help you get ready to quit your job, and I’d like to be able to talk to you directly. Superhero Academy is holding a free webinar later this month to walk you through these steps we’ve already discussed, and much more.

We want to share with you how…

  • To commit to a path for three months to see incredible success
  • To save enough money to make any major change, and turn risks into opportunities
  • To turn your passions into values that people will gladly pay you for
  • To attract the people willing to pay you for the value you create
  • To use expert knowledge to become an expert yourself

Click Here To Sign Up for the Creating A Life Of Impact Class

But I also don’t want to leave you hanging today. If any of the links below describe you, click them to receive a free resource that will get you on the path of taking control of your life right now.

I want to figure out what to do with my life

I have a project in mind but want help getting started

I want to bring my skills to the next level so I can excel in life

I want to create a movement to change the world

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Consciousness

Four Key Elements Of “True Love” According To The Teaching of The Buddha

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CE Staff Writer 2 minute read

In Brief

  • The Facts:

    Thich Nhat Hanh, a Vietnamese Buddhist Monk explains the four key elements of "true love" according to the teaching of the Buddha.

  • Reflect On:

    Where does our idea of love come from these days? How much of it is influenced by pop culture? Is a relationship necessary to experience true love, is it something we can experience within ourselves and with our relationship with family and friends?

Before you begin...

Coherent icon

Take a moment and breathe. Place your hand over your chest area, near your heart. Breathe slowly into the area for about a minute, focusing on a sense of ease entering your mind and body. Click here to learn why we suggest this.

What is love? What is ‘true’ love? Can it even be defined? Is it even dependant on being in a relationship with someone? Our idea of what true love is today may comes from a fairytale, movie, or reality TV show, and the definition has likely changed many times. But we all have certain conditions attached to our idea of what love is, or some sort of criteria drawn up for what our ‘perfect match’ would look like, and I’m not saying there’s anything wrong with that. Perhaps true love is much more simple than popular culture would have us believe. As Thich Nhat Hanh (a Vietnamese Buddhist Monk) explains below, if there is love/kindness, compassion, joy, and inclusiveness, according to Buddhist teaching, you are experiencing true love. It’s pretty simple. True love doesn’t necessarily have to be something magical that sprung out of a fairy tale, although if that’s the case there’s nothing wrong with that either.

The main points taken from the video are that love and kindness have the power to create happiness.  When you are able to develop  feelings of joy and happiness in yourself, that’s true love, offered to yourself. If you can generate these feelings, and help the other person generate these feelings, that’s true love. So, if you are a source of joy and happiness for another, that is true love. True love is the capacity to make yourself suffer less, and help the other person suffer less. “There is an art of suffering. If you know how to suffer, you suffer much, much less.” Practice compassion and it will grow and if love does not generate joy, it’s not love. If love makes the other person cry every day, it’s not love.

It seems that “true love” can be a choice. You can choose to be in a relationship and cultivate these feelings with anybody. “True love is capable of generating joy for yourself and for the other person.” What do you think ‘true love’ is?

Dive Deeper

These days, it’s not just knowing information and facts that will create change, it’s changing ourselves, how we go about communicating, and re-assessing the underlying stories, ideas and beliefs that form our world. We have to practice these things if we truly want to change. At Collective Evolution and CETV, this is a big part of our mission.

Amongst 100's of hours of exclusive content, we have recently completed two short courses to help you become an effective changemaker, one called Profound Realization and the other called How To Do An Effective Media Detox.

Join CETV, engage with these courses and more here!

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Consciousness

9 Common Traits Among People Who Are Genuinely Happy

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CE Staff Writer 5 minute read

In Brief

  • The Facts:

    Below is a list of common traits I've observed in people who are genuinely happy. It's a great list and something we can all learn and grow from.

  • Reflect On:

    Is happiness dependent on external factors, or is it something found within? These common traits have nothing to do with the material world, but more so represent changes we can all make within, a shift in consciousness.

Before you begin...

Coherent icon

Take a moment and breathe. Place your hand over your chest area, near your heart. Breathe slowly into the area for about a minute, focusing on a sense of ease entering your mind and body. Click here to learn why we suggest this.

Happiness: the term thrown around more often than any other when people are asked what they aspire to most in life. A loving partner, a fun high-paying job, and endless world travel are also among some of the most common answers, but all of these are preference-based means to the one ultimate end, which is happiness.

Being so sought-after, I thought I’d put together a list of traits that seem to be common to happy people — and I’m talking about the genuinely happy people, not just those who appear to be so on the surface.

In compiling this list I’m not suggesting that these are the only keys to happiness; I simply hope to shed light on some common characteristics I’ve noticed happy people share. I am also not implying that happy people don’t experience moments and periods of unhappiness in their lives.

1. Love Themselves For Who They Are

On the surface this may sound incredibly egotistical, but I simply mean that they are truly comfortable in their own shoes. They accept and embrace their physical appearance, they maintain their true character traits regardless of whether or not they receive approval for them, and they work to make the best of the human experience they are living, rather than wallow in what others would define as weaknesses or shortcomings.

2. See Relationships as an Extension To, Rather Than the Basis Of, The Human Experience

Relationships, whether friendly, familial, or romantic, are certainly one of the greatest parts of the human experience. However, far too many of us let their presence or absence, and even more so the value we attribute to them, dictate our overall happiness in life. I’ve found that genuinely happy people tend to find complete contentment within themselves, and see all relationships as the awesome extension of their already complete self. It’s often when we are not looking for others to fill a particular void, or to make us feel a certain way, that most of our truest and most valuable relationships form.

3. Embrace Change

Life is a constant lesson and happy people tend to be well aware of that. Not only are they always open to change, but they truly listen to suggestions, respect and consider all opinions, and take criticism constructively rather than with offence.

4. Celebrate Rather Than Despair in the Accomplishments of Others

Jealousy is a killer, and as Gary Allan once said, “You can be the moon and still be jealous of the stars.” We are all capable of accomplishing anything in this life and are the only ones that are going to find the drive within ourselves to do it. Rather than observe and compare to those who have accomplished, the truly happy tend to celebrate those successes and use them as motivation to accomplish more within their own lives.

5. Never Dwell in Being a Victim

We’ve all been the so-called “victim” of several things in life, whether it be an unexpected breakup, job termination, or even domestic abuse. Truly happy people tend to be those who choose not to dwell in the feeling of having been wronged. They choose to let their difficult experiences strengthen them, rather than wear them as a badge of weakness or as the thing that makes them consistently worthy of receiving sympathy.

6. They Live in the Present

As fun as reminiscing about the past or fantasizing about the future can be, nothing will ever be done in anything but the present and happy people tend to realize that. Not only that, they use that knowledge as motivation to make the most of each and every moment. In addition to being motivating, presence can also come in handy for truly appreciating those moments of relaxation, allowing yourself to be truly in them rather than distracted by future concerns.

7. Trust That Everything Happens For a Reason

This can easily be paired with the choice against victimhood, but happy people tend to trust the process and existence of everything in their life. They know that nothing is ever too big to handle and choose to embrace what life is currently throwing at them rather than cowering at the sight of it or wallowing in self-pity.

8. They Don’t Let Money Dictate Their Lives

Nobody is denying that, in this world right now, we all need money to exist, and as a result, many of us spend the bulk of our lives doing things that help us earn it. What I’ve found sets happy people apart is that they don’t let money be the ultimate dictator in their life. They still make sensible choices within their means, but they never let money: A) prevent them from pursuing a so-called “risky” passion, B) be the factor that is blamed for why their life is so miserable, or C) complain about how little they have. There are creative ways to do everything in this world, and only recognizing and valuing the traditional ways of making money cripples that creativity.

9. Look Within For Solutions

One of the most powerful realizations a genuinely happy person will often operate based on is “change starts within.” The empowerment that comes with not only realizing this truth but also using it as the backbone to everything in life can be quite remarkable. There are thousands of books, mantras, techniques, and practices out there that can all help us to find solutions to so many things in life, but they all require one thing to truly be serviceable: the consciousness to support them.


For more brutally honest personal development content designed for those who actually want to change be sure to subscribe to my YouTube channel and to sign up to receive a copy of my free eBook.

Dive Deeper

These days, it’s not just knowing information and facts that will create change, it’s changing ourselves, how we go about communicating, and re-assessing the underlying stories, ideas and beliefs that form our world. We have to practice these things if we truly want to change. At Collective Evolution and CETV, this is a big part of our mission.

Amongst 100's of hours of exclusive content, we have recently completed two short courses to help you become an effective changemaker, one called Profound Realization and the other called How To Do An Effective Media Detox.

Join CETV, engage with these courses and more here!

Continue Reading

Consciousness

Your “Shadow Self.” How To Face It, Bring It To Light & Transcend It

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7 minute read

Before you begin...

Coherent icon

Take a moment and breathe. Place your hand over your chest area, near your heart. Breathe slowly into the area for about a minute, focusing on a sense of ease entering your mind and body. Click here to learn why we suggest this.

“What you most need will be found where you least want to look, but you have to look purposefully. If it chases you, then you’re the prey; if you confront it, you can transcend it.” – Jordan Peterson

There is a lot written about shadow and what it is. The direction is clear. Shadow is something we repress and hide from others, and in most cases, from ourselves. Where does it originate and what can we do to integrate or heal it?

Let’s begin by asking ‘why we have a shadow?’ Is it because we carry darkness at our core or does the shadow take shape over our lifetime as residue of fear, rage, shame and guilt, and their avoidance? I’d say a little bit of both. On the human collective level, we carry trauma related to suffering and aggression of our ancestors. But for the most part, our shadow develops during this lifetime in the form of a complex and sophisticated personality, that keeps us with a sense of control.

Deep down we feel vulnerable but try to hide it

Our inner world is complex and for some, unbearable. We continuously face and fear exposure of our contradictory complexity, towards ourselves and others. Instead of delving into the depth of our psyche and inviting more consciousness, we would rather guard ourselves. The more conscious we are, the more responsible we become for our actions. One of the reasons we so meticulously hide our shadow is because we don’t want to carry the consequence of our actions. And so, our vulnerability and shadow are closely linked.

There are many effective ways not to feel vulnerable and retain a sense of innocence. Abiding by a strict morality, adhering to ideologies, be they social, political or spiritual, or relying on religious dogma, all achieve exactly that protection. The kind of protection in which we cradle ourselves in feelings of righteousness and innocence. This is not to imply we shouldn’t seek for our actions to be moral or avoid believing but to become aware when they are used in service of feeling superior over others. Interestingly enough, our wish to remain innocent is a big shadow in and of itself.

So, while we’re busy repressing and controlling, the shadow feeds and grows with every attempt to fight off rejection, humiliation or punishment, as well as situations that leave us feeling guilty and ashamed

Here are some examples of how our shadow hides our vulnerability. Let’s say we want to be recognized for something we’ve done. Instead of asking for acknowledgment, we hide it through false humility and become resentful for not getting the attention we feel we deserve. Another example is our need to belong and be important to others. But again, instead of communicating this need, which makes us vulnerable to rejection, we make others feel important in the hope of being praised for our actions. Over time we’ve developed innumerable sophisticated ways to sugarcoat our shadows and feel in control.

Shadow integration begins with an honesty that seeks nothing in return

We can see, that most shadow has to do with survival attempts of some kind. This happens when we try to control our environments by behaving as victims, gaining respect through false humility, moral superiority and other forms of manipulation. When we talk about shadow integration, it’s crucial we are precise as to what the facets of our shadow are.

We want to, for example, be able to say, while refraining from any judgment, that ‘I smile at others, in order not to be attacked’ or ‘I control my partner by making him or her feel guilty’. Any judgment of what we discover in ourselves is a hidden attempt at victimizing ourselves and finding excuses. The ‘why’ is of secondary importance here, because the list of reasons is endless and the absolute source is difficult to pinpoint, but the urge to limit our vulnerability is still there.

This may be a good moment to say, that shadow integration is not about redemption, but about understanding the inner workings of vulnerability and protection, which are closely linked to our sense of survival, both physical and emotional.

Furthermore, we want to face our shadows, not to feel better or lighter in the future, but in order to become more integrated within ourselves and lessen the sense of separation that the shadow produces. We want to return integrity that comes with the responsibility of belonging to a history and culture that experiences a great deal of suffering and is greater than our individual selves. Integrating our shadow implies allowing the darkness to be part of us, without the desire to surpass it.

Drop the hope for a pain-free life

When we face our shadow, we want to fully own the aggression, fear, selfishness or greed living inside us. We want to clarify first and foremost to ourselves how we play power games and seek control. This acknowledgment doesn’t necessarily reduce the hurt to ourselves or others or enable us to change. There is no certain outcome from shadow integration and that’s a tough pill to swallow. What we’re ‘simply’ doing, is bringing something hidden to light, without the attempt to make it more or less significant or dramatic, but rather see it as it is, thereby becoming more aware.

The more emotionality we induce into the characterization of our shadow, the less integration takes place. Shadow integration should be a non-dramatic act, surrounded by a hint of coolness, where we observe who we’ve become. We will feel the pain of lies, betrayal and hurt to others during this observation. And in the process of doing so, holding back judgment, positive or negative, is truly challenging. How is it possible ‘not to comment’ on what we regard as a personal experience? We need to understand that any commentary also contains the attempt to change the experience, be it freeing or punishing to us.

Healing the shadow is a magical process in which we are the participant, not the director

The great challenge in shadow integration is to grow our capacity to be with or hold an experience without having the ability to change it. What has been done is in the past and can’t be undone; it can only be held and by holding it patiently, more facets can emerge and be seen. Like when a child injures itself, we can only hold them to share the pain of waiting for healing to take place, but the magic of healing has its own mysterious timeline.

When we own our shadow, it puts us in a helpless and humbling place. It shows us our limitations and that is something we don’t want to feel. Maximizing our potential for our own feelings of greatness is just another shadow. Acknowledging the limitation of our potential, without minimizing our strength or exercising false humility, allows us to share our light.

Life comes with a lot of limitations and the shadow tries to interfere with life itself. Facing our shadow is a spiritual act as we embrace and allow a little more of our human totality to be included. Through this experience, we can get in touch with a humility and simplicity, that can often touch something at our core, which is mystically meaningful and expanding.

Integration comes from a place that is non-dramatic, because drama always takes sides, and it makes us miss the simplicity lying in the acknowledgment of human complexity. Shadow integration is a lifelong and even a magical process. It happens when we are completely truthful, giving up all deals with God or fate, and surrendering to what we essentially are: vulnerable. We want to invite feeling the pain our shadow reveals to us without seeking redemption. In a way, every time we say yes to a shadow part in us, we agree to re-enter continuous vulnerability of being human.

This is where integration begins.

Dive Deeper

These days, it’s not just knowing information and facts that will create change, it’s changing ourselves, how we go about communicating, and re-assessing the underlying stories, ideas and beliefs that form our world. We have to practice these things if we truly want to change. At Collective Evolution and CETV, this is a big part of our mission.

Amongst 100's of hours of exclusive content, we have recently completed two short courses to help you become an effective changemaker, one called Profound Realization and the other called How To Do An Effective Media Detox.

Join CETV, engage with these courses and more here!

Continue Reading
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