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50 Children’s Books To Inspire & Motivate Your Kids

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The adults of today grew up before the boom of technology.

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While children nowadays have iPads and laptops, the children of yesteryears had pop-up books and colouring materials.

With all the present day distractions that consume every child’s focus and attention, it’s more important than ever that children today channel their energies into an age-old healthy habit: reading.

Start by revisiting your favourite children’s books, or check online and the bookstore for new titles that were written specifically for the current generation.

“A book in hand, new or old, it doesn’t matter truth be told. To love to read and read with love is treasure worth far more than gold.”

Okay, so I made that up. I’ve got my Dr. Seuss groove on. Think about what your children are missing every time they dive into their tablets and smartphones. So much imagination and mental stimulation is just going down the drain.

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Let’s put an end to that with this jewel of a list of 50 inspiring and motivating children’s books that you and your kids will surely love.

1. An Awesome Book!

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This book by Dallas Clayton inspires us to think outside the box and dream big dreams. The colorful drawings and simple words shoot for the heart as we are reminded that dreams fuel the world.

2. Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are?

Dr. Seuss is a staple name in households with children. In this book, an old man would always tell Duckie about people who are unluckier than him. This book is a total pick-me-upper, planting a sense of thankfulness and contentment to take around with you for times when you’re feeling down.

3. I Believe in Me: A Book of Affirmations

This popular book by Connie Bowen reminds us that we are all amazing. The title doesn’t leave anything to surprise, but it will astound as well as invigorate with all the inspiring words that decorate each page.

4. One Love

This heartwarming story by Cedella Marley, Bob Marley’s eldest, is full of positive messages about the beautiful things that can happen when we are united by one love.

5. The Giving Tree

This masterpiece by Shel Silverstein tells a story about giving and loving. The relationship between the tree and the boy is something that pierces the heart and teaches lessons that will last a lifetime.

6. The Little Engine That Could

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This story by Watty Piper is about a small engine that saves the day. Though small, the little engine is a big reminder that we can do something great when we put our minds to it.

7. You Can Be Anything!

Gary Craig’s book continues to inspire readers to believe in themselves. While it’s big on motivation, it also reminds us that we are special in our own unique way. It also shares the lesson of not seeing our worth through other people’s eyes.

8. Have You Filled A Bucket Today?

Carol McCloud encourages readers to be kind. The book talks about an invisible bucket each of us have, and how these buckets are filled when people do nice things for us. It emphasizes how far daily acts of kindness can go to affecting other people’s lives. Definitely the master converter of “bucket fillers.”

9. Where the Wild Things Are

This Maurice Sendak classic tells the story of a misbehaving child who learns a lesson on unconditional love. Although it touches the anger in children, it ends with a reminder that love endures all things.

[Follow up on reading the book by watching the film version: Where the Wild Things Are (2009)]

10. Love You Forever

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Its pages tell of the powerful love that parents feel for their children. Robert Munsch has touched a lot of hearts and will continue to do so through this book. Much like the undying love of parents, this literary piece will endure for generations to come.

11. Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

Another masterpiece by the great Dr. Seuss, this book is perfect for all graduates — whether from nursery or law school. It talks about new beginnings and experiences and sets readers on the course of braving their new journeys.

12. Dreams to Grow On 

Christine Hurley Deriso tells the story of a young girl who imagines her future. Though for children, the lessons will likewise whisper a reminder to adults that it is never too late to dream.

13. Hug Time

Patrick McDonnell reminds us of the power of a hug. This story tells us that, though a hug is simple, its effects are powerful and life-altering.

14. The Three Questions

Jon J. Muthwrote this book based on a story by Leo Tolstoy. It makes readers think of their own answers to the three questions it asks. Offering wonderful opportunities for reflection, this book is a great conversation starter between parents and children.

15. One

Kathryn Otoshi teaches readers about numbers and colours while delivering a powerful message about acceptance and how one voice can change everything.

16. You Be You

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Linda Kranz and her famous fish explain the value and importance of acceptance. It teaches us to cherish and value the uniqueness of everyone, and that it is our individuality that makes us special.

17. Only One You

Again, Linda Kranz uses colorful graphics to convey a powerful message. This time, it’s about lessons that parents share with their children. Definitely something for all ages, its life lessons make the book an unforgettable favorite.

18. Thank You, World

Alice McGinty paints a story of eight kids who are each in different continents which serves to remind us to value and enjoy the simple things in life.

19. Incredible You! 10 Ways to Let Your Greatness Shine Through 

Dr. Wayne Dyer uses simple words to educate readers about how the tools and secrets to happiness and success are already within us. It also details actionable ways on how to unleash our individual greatness.

20. Enemy Pie

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It’s always hard to make friends, more so when people are worlds different. This endearing story by Derek Munson shares the ups and downs of making new friends and the joy that comes with the triumph of overcoming differences.

21. The Artist Who Painted A Blue Horse

Eric Carle brings out the artist in you as you leaf through every page of his book. The story is a celebration of art, colour, imagination, and life itself.

22. The Dot

Peter H. Reynolds’ bestseller helps bring out the creative in each one of us — even in those who believe they are not. It shows us that amazing artwork can begin with a simple dot.

23. Amazing Grace

This positive and optimistic book by Mary Hoffman embraces everyone’s unique differences. It also tells us that we can achieve whatever we want as long as we never give up confidently reaching for our goals.

24. David Gets in Trouble

David Shannon tells us the story of a young boy who always has a good excuse for everything and later on feels bad about this. The story goes on to share the value of saying sorry and owning up to one’s mistakes.

25. Good People Everywhere

good-people

This picture book by Lynea Gillen shares a wonderful story about compassion and kindness. It talks about the goodness of people of all ages, and makes you appreciate the people around you.

26. A Bad Case of Stripes

David Shannon once again delivers a memorable message, this time about peer pressure and its ill effects. It ends on a note that will help you embrace everything that makes you a unique individual.

27. The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore

William Joyce reminds us that books are a source of comfort. In this day of technology, a book about reading and absolutely loving it is what everyone needs to see.

28. Where the Sidewalk Ends

Shel Silverstein’s bestseller brings us to a different world. This collection of unique poems and drawings will make you laugh, cry, and embrace imagination.

29. Beautiful Oops!

This storybook by Barney Saltzberg is a certified comforter. It brings comfort upon those who make mistakes while saying that our misfortunes are gateways to new beginnings.

30. Stand Tall, Molly Lou Melon

Patty Lovell introduces Molly Lou Melon, who’s not your typical protagonist. She may be different, but she is confident in who she is. Molly is an inspiration to both children and adults because of her infectious and motivating attitude.

31. Spaghetti in a Hot Dog Bun: Having the Courage to Be Who You Are

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Maria Dismondy’s story empowers children to be proud of who they are even if people try to bring them down. The book emphasizes the importance of being kind to others and always treating them right.

32. On My Way to a Happy Life

Deepak Chopra’s book holds ideas that can help children embrace life with love and joy. It holds insights on how to best appreciate even the smallest things.

33. My Many Colored Days

Another treasure by Dr. Seuss, this vibrant book helps readers express their feelings through the use of colour. The colours bounce off the pages and captivate the reader because of the emotions that they stir and bring to life.

34. I Think, I Am!

Reading this book will help change your negative thoughts into positive ones. Louise L. Hay tells us that we can control our thoughts and, in turn, control our lives. The confidence that this book imparts makes it well worth the read.

35. All I See is Part of Me

Chara M. Curtis brings you on an adventure that lets you discover how you are connected to everything. It helps make you appreciate yourself and all the wonderful creations around you.

36. Not a Box

When is a box not a box? When it’s a car, of course. Or a spaceship. Or anything else you want it to be. Antoinette Portis encourages her readers to let imagination take over the wheel. With generous helpings of imagination, an ordinary box can bring you to places where anything can happen.

37. If the World Were a Village

David J. Smith seeks to inspire readers to be responsible citizens. The book teaches children to be aware of what is happening in the world and to be involved and active in making the world a better place. Its lessons don’t only make it informative and motivating but inspiring and patriotic as well.

38. Yay, You! Moving Out, Moving Up, Moving On 

Sandra Boynton gives us a book that talks about change and new beginnings. While its bold messages are powerful, it’s a very light and invigorating read.

39. I Have a Dream

Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous speech that was made into a book is still inspiring generation after generation. Aside from providing valuable insights on history, his words about equality and slavery continue to ring true up to this day.

40. Dream: A Tale of Wonder, Wisdom & Wishes

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This award-winning book by Susan V. Bosak tells a story through wonderful illustrations, taking us on a journey highlighted by hopes and dreams, and challenging us to chase after them no matter what.

41. The Wump World

Bill Peet’s book started making waves in 1981, but its message is still relevant  today, especially with the issues of environmental sustainability. This book will make you want take part in generating sustainable action in solving earth’s problems.

42. Life Doesn’t Frighten Me

Maya Angelou’s resounding words make us believe that we are indeed strong and courageous. This book takes you to a place without fear and celebrates the victories of courage.

43. Say Something

This revolutionary and timely book by Peggy Moss is about bullying and having the courage to talk about it. It also dwells on the witnesses and how, by doing nothing, they greatly affect the situation.

44. Tear Soup (A Recipe for Healing after Loss) 

Pat Schwiebert’s book is about coping with loss. Though it talks about a grown-up topic such as loss, it does so quite simply and relatably that we likewise learn how to handle grief.

45. Each Kindness

Jacqueline Woodson’s story about bullying is powerful. It talks about rejection, friendship, and how small acts of kindness can have major effects.

46. Hey Little Ant

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This big story by Phillip M. Hoose has a small ant as the main character. It’s a fun story about seeing the world through the perspective of someone else — even someone as small as an ant.

47. The Smile That Went Around the World 

A smile may be one of the simplest things to do, but it sure does have lots of great effects on people. This priceless story by Patrice Karst is about how the power of one smile can affect and change the world.

48. Unstoppable Me: 10 Ways to Soar Through Life 

Dr. Wayne Dyer writes another book that exudes positivity. Lessons include the importance of taking risks, and dealing with anxiety. It also tells us how to live in the moment and to appreciate every second of our lives.

49. You Are Special

This heart-warming story by Max Lucado makes us understand how special we all are. No matter how different we may be and no matter what people think about us, God loves us just the way we are.

50. Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, Very Bad Day

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This book authored by Judith Viorst and Ray Cruz tells the story of a boy who wakes up to a very bad day. This book is funny and charming, and it teaches us how everybody has bad days every once in a while — even those who live in Australia.

[Follow up on reading the book by watching the film version: Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day (Theatrical)]


All these titles sound pretty exciting. The best part is that this selection speaks to adults as well as it does to children. We’re never too old to learn a thing or two, even if it is from a picture book.

So what are you waiting for? Get one or all of these books now! Project Bookworm coming right up!

Bonus Suggestion

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In addition to reading, music is also key in the upbringing of your child. Rather than consistently exposing them to what the mainstream has to offer, we at CE suggest the following children’s album put together by a good friend of ours. The album is called The Greatest Me, and it features 18 inspiring songs with affirmations to empower children. It also happens to be tuned to the frequency of 432.

Free David Wilcock Screening: Disclosure & The Fall of the Cabal

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So far, the response to this interview has been off the charts as people are calling it the most concise update of what's happening in our world today.

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Consciousness

Red Team vs. Blue Team | Toxic Tribalism We Must Transcend

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In Brief

  • The Facts:

    Public discourse is dominated by a dual-based system of categorization and rigid identity. The end-goal of interaction is not to broaden perspective and work together – but to argue and “win” a debate. It is time to transcend this paradigm.

  • Reflect On:

    How can we institute a more open-minded framework whereby public discourse can be influenced by a multi-directional approach to sharing information and viewpoints? The need for a new narrative is upon us – we are all a part of it.

We’ve all experienced it.  You log on to Facebook and scroll through your timeline – and there it is: a fiery argument where insults are flying freely on a subject that charges you.  Though you may aim to steer clear of the sludge and toxicity of social media comment sections – perhaps you decided to lunge into a particular topic that you care deeply about.

Almost inevitably – an argument takes place where emotions reach a crescendo and the “debate” devolves into sophomoric insults where both sides are trying to tear each other’s character down instead of engaging in discourse on the merits of respective viewpoints.

Often, we find ourselves scrambling to score points by reflexively reacting to current events based on agenda and cultural identifiers, (nationality, orientation, race, creed, religion etc..) arguing over semantics, using trigger terms, stereotypes, and gross generalizations to stir the pot of frantic frenzy.  There is a primordial root to this way of interacting with each other.  From the very beginning of our history on this planet, we were thrust into a world where “the others” were viewed as an imminent danger that must be defeated, lest we be invaded and taken over.  In modern times, this tribal notion of “the others” often manifests as an idea, viewpoint, or perspective outside of our own, and it is often perceived as a threat that must be beaten down.

This has come to typify our state of discourse – whether it’s in corporate media, in Congress, on social media, or elsewhere – it has become abundantly clear that we are feeding into endless argumentation that features polarized “sides” of an argument – and there are often only two viewpoints presented as acceptable to latch onto. We anger quickly, posit ourselves in a reflexive defensive posture, and prepare to debate with one another in a way that perpetuates conflict instead of fostering education and cooperation.

The quest to be “right” or to “win” the argument takes precedence over actually listening with an open mind to an alternative viewpoint, robbing us of the opportunity to learn something new, expand our perspective, and integrate new data into our thought process to assist in evolving our consciousness.  Scientists call this motivative reasoning: a phenomenon where our unconscious motivations (beliefs/desires/fears) shape the way we interpret information.  Some ideas resonate with what we identify with – and we want them to win.  Other ideas sound like the “other” side – and we want to denigrate, defeat and banish those ideas out of the discourse.  When we apply this to our world we see how the polarizing power of partisanship and deeply held belief-systems influences our perceptions of the world around us.

“Motivated reasoning theory suggests that reasoning processes (information selection and evaluation, memory encoding, attitude formation, judgment, and decision-making) are influenced by motivations or goals. Motivations are desired end-states that individuals want to achieve. The number of these goals that have been theorized is numerous, but political scientists have focused principally on two broad categories of motivations: accuracy motivations (the desire to be “right” or “correct”) and directional or defensive motivations (the desire to protect or bolster a predetermined attitude or identity).” ~Thomas J. Leeper

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Even when we think we’re being objective/fair-minded – we still can wind up unconsciously arguing for something with mechanical repetition – even when the empirical evidence shows that there is no sound basis for our argument.  We’ve become more adept at crafting and presenting an argument than conducting an actual investigation and critical thinking into the truth of the matter at hand.

But shouldn’t our motivation to find truth be more prominent than our motivation to be “right” or to cherry-pick arguments and articles that reinforce our own views? How can we cut through our prejudices/biases and motivation – and look at data and information as objectively as possible?

Making A Change

Perhaps it begins with shedding overly rigid identities and boxes that have been created for us in order to herd us into predictable boxes.  How often do you find yourself parroting a viewpoint or argument that you feel is aligned with your primary identity?  Perhaps you identify primarily as a Democrat.  If so – should your entire viewpoint be defined by this identifier to where you only agree with policies and/or ideas presented by those on your team (Team Democrat)?  If you identify as a woman – is that all you are?  If you consider yourself a Christian – must your perspective only be aligned with a narrow prescription of popularized Christian “values”?  If you consider yourself part of the “conscious community” – must everything be understood and reasoned through that filter?

This isn’t to say that identity isn’t important.  Expressing a sense of who we are is paramount – but that expression is unnecessarily limited when we aren’t open-minded and don’t allow for a full-spectrum experience. Identity politics is always an ever-evolving realm, and many of us attach more value to certain identifiers than others, be it race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, etc.. It’s respectful to be supportive of an individual’s universal right to self-identify (or even their right not to identify at all), but it is also helpful to exercise a level of suspicion about the ability of rigid identifiers and social constructs (like race and gender) to accurately portray the multi-dimensional beings that we are.

“There’s a dangerous corrosive side to identity politics, ie: making one’s gender/skin color/religion/sect/sexuality one’s *defining* trait. Between groups this can divide people rather than unite them, promoting rather than reducing group stereotypes, and therefore increasing discrimination.

Within groups this can lend itself to reinforcing a hegemony for those individual members who refuse to conform to what being a member of that group is *meant* to mean, as defined by that community’s internal power structures. This is like the old trope “You can’t be a true Muslim/black man, and be gay”.  ~Maajid Nawaz

Breaking down these constructs and constrictive identifiers will usher in a new framework for discourse.  Currently, major media and news outlets rarely put forth effort in facilitating an open-range discourse, and are capitalizing (and in many instances feeding) the toxic tribalism where only two-view points are presented without any real effort to find intersectionality or genuine exchange. We see the phenomena of “both sides of the same coin” playing itself out again and again as it pertains to a polarized duality of public opinion.   Thus, the vast percentage of the populace are unconsciously bombarded with polarized view-points that unseat their own ability to find the neutral and to explore new thought-forms outside of the limits of dual categorization.

An unknown ‘something’ has taken possession of a smaller or greater portion of the psyche and asserts its hateful and harmful existence undeterred by all our insight, reason, and energy, thereby proclaiming the power of the unconscious over the conscious mind, the sovereign power of possession.”  ~Carl Jung

It would be prudent for all of us to examine whether our own psyches and intellects have been unseated by an unknown, unconscious force. We are now tasked to get back in the driver’s seat of our own consciousness, turn off cruise-control, and navigate our own vehicles.  Just as the fleshly body must be cleansed of parasites and toxins such that they don’t become hosts for worms that weaken the body’s vitality, the mind must go through its own filtration process to clear out intrusions and predictive programming that wane our original core vibrational thought patterns.  Otherwise, we are often just passive receivers of whatever the TV is downloading into our minds.

The Need for Innovative Narrative

So who are the new story-tellers who can create a more progressive narrative of universality?  A narrative where we seek to understand each other by coalescing in multi-sensory empathy and cosmic commonality?  A narrative which rejects that humanity is a simple, basic species that can easily be divided into boxes of artificially devised social constructs.  A narrative which recognizes that we are coming out of an age of spiritual amnesia – and many of our societal problems are related to our universal yearning for meaning, truth, and a desire to be connected, balanced, and whole in our relationship with each other and our selves. The need for a new narrative is upon us – and we each bring a unique gift that is required to comprise the tapestry of our immediate position in this time/space.

Free David Wilcock Screening: Disclosure & The Fall of the Cabal

We interviewed David about what is happening within the cabal and disclosure. He shared some incredible insight that is insanely relevant to today.

So far, the response to this interview has been off the charts as people are calling it the most concise update of what's happening in our world today.

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Consciousness

Was Meditation What Kept The Thai Boys Calm While Trapped In The Cave?

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In Brief

  • The Facts:

    Mindfulness and Buddhist meditation has been proven to reduce symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress. The boys trapped in the cave were taught this technique and many feel it may have assisted them in staying calm.

  • Reflect On:

    If this practice could help these boys who were literally trapped in a cage, could it be of benefit to those of us who are feeling trapped, emotionally or spiritually?

Recently, 12 Thai boys had been discovered after being trapped in a cave during a heavy monsoon. They all made it out alive and are in good health. One may wonder, how on earth were these boys able to remain calm while in the cave with no knowledge as to whether or not they would be found?

They were reportedly taught a method of Buddhist or mindfulness meditation to assist them with their intensely physical and emotional challenge.

“Look at how calm they were sitting there waiting. No one was crying or anything. It was astonishing,” the mother of one of the boys told the AP, referring to a viral video of the moment the boys were found.

How Did This Come About?

The boys’ coach, Ekapol Chanthawong, had led the boys on a hike into the cave that they had been to before, but sadly due to heavy rains, the cave flooded on June 23, trapping the boys inside. Thankfully, Ekapol had been trained in the practice of meditation while he was a Buddhist monk for a decade before becoming a soccer coach. As it turns out this skill was a very good one to have considering the circumstances of their predicament. Multiple news sources reported that he taught the boys, aged 11 to 16 how to meditate in the cave to keep them calm and to preserve their energy through their nearly two-week dilemma.

“He could meditate up to an hour,” Ekapol’s aunt, Tham Chanthawong, told the AP. “It has definitely helped him and probably helps the boys to stay calm.”

Ekapol, 25 went to live in a monastery at the age of 12 after becoming an orphan. The Straights Times reported that he trained to be a monk for 10 years at a monastery in Mae Sai, Thailand, but eventually left to take care of his sick grandmother. After that, he was hired to become the assistant coach of the soccer team, the Wild Boars.

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Keep in mind, these boys had no food and very little water while in the cave.

Did The Meditation Save Them?

There is really no way to know the answer to that question with absolute certainty, however, it must have helped tremendously. Meditation can assist to calm the mind, lower stress and help to connect to the power within. This particular style of Buddhist meditation has been around for thousands of years after the Buddha began teaching it as a tool for achieving a level of clarity, peace of mind and a liberation from suffering. No doubt the boys would have felt some despair while in the cave, but it seems as though the meditation was able to help negate some of those emotions.

From Vox.com:

Though there are few randomized control trials on meditation and mental health, a 2014 meta-analysis by Johns Hopkins researchers for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality found that meditation, and in particular mindfulness, can have a role in treating depression, anxiety, and pain in adults — as much as medications but with no side effects. Meditation can also, to a lesser degree, reduce the toll of psychological distress, the review found. The research on kids is still fairly preliminary, though more and more schools are implementing mindfulness meditation programs.

How Can This Assist You?

Do you ever feel as though you’re trapped? There are heavy and pressing issues, but you just can’t seem to find a solution, the clarity that’s needed or a way to lessen the burden on your shoulders? If these Thai boys were able to stay calm while being physically trapped through the power of mindfulness meditation, then certainly there may be something here for you, too.

Meditation, in general, may be able to assist you to help you find the clarity and peace that you’ve been longing for, and the best part is — it can be done anywhere, anytime and for free. We have everything we need inside of us, we just have to take the time, to sit down, breathe and listen. To learn the practice of Buddhist or mindfulness meditation specifically, check out, An Introduction To Mindfulness Meditation, or dozens of other articles about the wide array of techniques, guides, and benefits of incorporating meditation into your life.

Related CE Article 

Rescue Of Thai Children Trapped In Cave Has Captivated Humanity 

Much Love

Free David Wilcock Screening: Disclosure & The Fall of the Cabal

We interviewed David about what is happening within the cabal and disclosure. He shared some incredible insight that is insanely relevant to today.

So far, the response to this interview has been off the charts as people are calling it the most concise update of what's happening in our world today.

Watch the interview here.
Continue Reading

Consciousness

When Life Feels Like Too Much

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In Brief

  • The Facts:

    Sometimes in life, we can become overwhelmed with all that is taking place. Couple this with an increased shift in consciousness taking place, and it can sometimes feel a little 'crazy to get through each day.

  • Reflect On:

    Are you taking time to reflect and understand yourself? How about others? There is no doubt that we are experiencing a great deal of change, the question is are we meeting that change with open arms? Or resisting?

One of the best things about what we do here, I feel at least, is our ability to share personal experiences that others can draw from and share in the feeling of being in this all together. Let’s be honest, if we didn’t have others to share thoughts, feelings and emotions with, we would probably all go nuts in this shift!

I can say this for my fellow team members as well I am sure, we are all going through our own massive shifts and individually are all having a bumpy ride at times. Sometimes, it just gets a little overwhelming and becomes difficult to handle.

When we think of how much of a large-scale shift/change we are experiencing, we begin to realize how much is and will change, physically and mentally, in such a short period of time within our world. It almost seems like everything speeding up, and it’s tough to handle everything at once.

Energy that our bodies have not experienced much of are coming in all the time from the cosmos, and as we make changes within our own personal consciousness.

Mentally we are going from being very stuck and ingrained in our ways and beliefs, to realizing and remembering the truth of our entire existence and it’s purpose. Who we truly are. This truth may not be clear immediately when we are in the thick of challenges, but life is presenting change many ways for us all individually and collectively.

As we experience times of mental confusion or un-ease, we the chance, with awareness and willingness, to break out of some of the ‘stuck states’ many of us find ourselves in. To do this, we must take the time to reflect on what is taking place and our life, and slow things down.

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Uncomfortable?

When the times are uncomfortable and it just seems like it is too much to handle; seeing the world the way it is, watching as we are so disconnected from everything, realizing the differences we have created between one another, feeling like this is just not happening fast enough, and feeling like we cannot help, remember that you are changing – WE are changing.

It is happening very quickly and in many ways all of which may bring up frustration in each and every one of us. Remember to steer clear of creating drama surrounding things that may present, this drama comes from the mind and ego and is not the true self. We can use what the mind and ego has brought up to see what might need to be cleared out within ourselves.

Avoid covering up everything with affirmations and false smiles, this only band-aids the challenges and hides what actually needs to be looked at. Unfortunately, much of the “new age movement” has created some powerful beliefs around band-aiding or spiritual bypassing problems with what we think is “positivity.” Face your problems and your fears, don’t cover them up and pretend its just astral energies. own it, this is how we move forward. This also does not mean we should be reckless and lash out, venting our frustration, it simply means we must take time to be aware, be alone if need be and go easy on ourselves.

Not one of us is alone in this shift, and not one of us will see it pass by without having change take place in our experiences. Feel the knowing that we are collectively in this together, and take note of that when we see what may be presenting in others before we judge them.

Free David Wilcock Screening: Disclosure & The Fall of the Cabal

We interviewed David about what is happening within the cabal and disclosure. He shared some incredible insight that is insanely relevant to today.

So far, the response to this interview has been off the charts as people are calling it the most concise update of what's happening in our world today.

Watch the interview here.
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