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5 Core Components of the Human “Ego” We Should All Strive To Diminish, From Eckhart Tolle

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Ego: It’s something all of us have, yet most of us don’t really understand. According to Eckhart Tolle, who has written two of the most influential “spiritual” books of our time, “Most people are so completely identified with the voice in the head—the incessant stream of involuntary and compulsive thinking and the emotions that accompany it—that we may describe them as being possessed by their mind.”

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“As long as you are completely unaware of this,” he continues, “you take the thinker to be who you are. This is the egoic mind. We call it egoic because there is a sense of self, of I (ego), in every thought—every memory, every interpretation, opinion, viewpoint, reaction, emotion. This is unconscious, spiritually speaking.

All quotes taken from A New Earth. 

He goes on to explain how our thoughts and thought patterns are conditioned by our past experiences, family life and upbringing, and overall environment that surrounds us.

“The central core of all your mind activity consists of certain repetitive and persistent thoughts, emotions, and reactive patterns that you identify with most strongly. This entity is the ego itself.”

The ego is full of thoughts and emotions with which each of us identify and which cause us to play certain roles in certain situations, without even being aware of it. And we have “collective identifications such as nationality, religion, race, social class, or political allegiance.”

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“It also contains personal identifications, not only with possessions, but also with opinions, external appearance, long-standing resentments, or concepts of yourself as better than or not as good as others, as a success or failure.”

He also describes how all our egos are essentially the same:

The content of the ego varies from person to person, but in every ego the same structure operates. In other words: Egos only differ on the surface. Deep down they are all the same. In what way are they the same? They live on identification and separation. When you live through the mind-made self comprised of thought and emotion that is the ego, the basis for your identity is precarious because thought and emotion are bey their very nature ephemeral, fleeting. So every ego is continuously struggling for survival, trying to protect and enlarge itself. To uphold the I-thought, it needs the opposite thought of “the other.” The others are most other when I see them as my enemies. At one end of the scale of this unconscious egoic pattern lies the egoic compulsive habit of faultfinding and complaining about others. Jesus referred to it when he said, “Why do you see the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye?”

5 Core Components of the Ego

Complaining and Resentment

What is complaining? A lot of the time it is a lack of gratitude and awareness. It’s a feeling that places us in the victim mentality, a feeling that ‘something has happened to me.’ This is the ‘I’ to which Tolle refers. Complaining is the result of your mind taking on certain beliefs about how things should be and then finding fault when they end up being something else. It’s, as Tolle points out, “a little story the mind makes up that you completely believe in.”

“When you are in the grip of such an ego, complaining, especially about other people, is habitual and, of course, unconscious, which means you don’t know what you are doing.”

Another part of this is blame, which often goes hand in hand with complaining. When you feel as if something has been “done to you” by someone else, you are completely engulfed in your ego. While this doesn’t apply to all situations, it does to most. Judging and complaining about another person often reflects ourselves and our inner state. Stating that “he is this” or “she is like that” is simply, again, a story your mind is making up based on various observations and experiences.

This happens all the time. Having thoughts about someone else in general indicates that your mind is making up a story, whether “good” or “bad.”

“Applying negative mental labels to people, either to their face or more commonly when you speak about them to others or even just think about them, is often part of this pattern. Name-calling is the crudest form of such labeling and of the ego’s need to be right and triumph over others: ‘jerk, bastard, bitch’—all definitive pronouncements that you can’t argue with.”

The ego will then gather with others, to confirm and encourage these views. We mask these tendencies by claiming they are normal, that when we are upset, we confide in others. But really, it’s just gathering with those we know will “support us” and agree with our viewpoints when we are upset.

“Resentment is the emotion that goes with complaining and the mental labeling of people and adds even more energy to the ego. Resentment means to feel bitter, indignant, aggrieved, or offended. You resent other people’s greed, their dishonesty, their lack of integrity, what they are doing, what they did in the past, what they said, what they failed to do, what they should or shouldn’t have done. The ego loves it. Instead of overlooking unconsciousness in others, you make it into their identity. Who is doing that? The unconsciousness in you, the ego. Sometimes the ‘fault’ that you perceive in another isn’t even there. It is a total misinterpretation, a projection by a mind conditioned to see enemies and to make itself right or superior. At other times, the fault may be there, but by focusing on it, sometimes to the exclusion of everything else, you amplify it. And what you react to in another, you strengthen in yourself.”

“Nonreaction to the ego in others is one of the most effective ways not only of going beyond ego in yourself but also of dissolving the collective human ego. But you can only be in a state of nonreaction if you can recognize someone’s behavior as coming from the ego, as being an expression of the collective human dysfunction. When you realize it’s not personal, there is no longer a compulsion to react as if it were. By not reacting to the ego, you will often be able to bring out the sanity in others, which is the unconditioned consciousness as opposed to the conditioned.”

Nonreaction, calm, and inner peace are key. This type of inner state, unless you’re a monk or other spiritual teacher, will also bring reaction from others within the “spiritual community.” Those who strive to diminish these aspects of the ego are constantly challenged by people like this. Egoic feelings of jealousy and disbelief will emerge, and you need to mitigate these through your non-reactionary state. They may also be in so much disbelief at your non-reactionary state that they simply believe you are “holding it in” or “building it up.”

“At times you may have to take practical steps to protect yourself from deeply unconscious people. This you can do without making them enemies. Your greatest protection, however, is being conscious. Somebody becomes an enemy if you personalize the unconsciousness that is the ego. Nonreaction is not weakness but strength. Another word for nonreaction is forgiveness. To forgive is to overlook, or rather to look through. You look through the ego to the sanity that is in every human being as his or her essence.”

Tolle does clarify that complaining is not to be confused with putting up with bad behaviour or quality. He uses the example of being served cold soup. You can tell your server nicely that your soup is cold and you would like it warmed up, which is different from complaining and making a statement such as, “How dare you serve me cold soup.”

The key to mitigating our complaining and resentment is to simply become aware of it and observe it. So many of us complain so regularly that we don’t even realize we’re doing it. It’s an unconscious habit that becomes a part of our everyday lives, so much so that people will even try to defend their right to complain.


“The moment you become aware of the ego in you, it is strictly speaking no longer the ego, but just as an old, conditioned mind-pattern. Ego implies unawareness. Awareness and ego cannot coexist. The old mind-pattern or mental habit may still survive and reoccur for a while because it has the momentum of thousands of years of collective human unconsciousness behind it, but every time it is recognized, it is weakened. “

Reactivity and Grievances

Reaction is one way for the ego to grow itself. We instantly react to a person or a situation in our lives that triggers and emotional response. In my experience, when you become aware of your reactivity and emotional response, those triggers begin to fade away. It’s not to say that we cannot feel these emotions, and take them on, but rather that we usually feel those emotions and let them take over more when we are unaware of our reaction. The next step is to, while feeling the emotional trigger — be it anger, hate or resentment — control your reaction and observe yourself from a distance. The more you do this, the easier it will become for you to not react from your emotional response. Furthermore, the more you practice this type of self-awareness, controlling your reaction will not only become easier, but the emotional response will diminish. You will no longer take on feelings of anger and frustration; it will be as if you have a protective shield around you, or a force field. Reaching this state brings you closer to diminishing this aspect of the ego.

Without observing yourself or becoming aware of these aspects, the cycle will just continue repeating itself. In your own life, and for collective humanity as a whole.

“There are many people who are always waiting for the next thing to react against, to feel annoyed or disturbed about, and it never takes long before they find it. ‘This is an outrage,’ they say. ‘How dare you …’ ‘I resent this.’ They are addicted to upset and anger as others are to a drug. Through reacting against this or that they assert and strengthen their feeling of self. A long-standing resentment is called a grievance. To carry grievances is to be in a permanent state of ‘against,’ and that is why grievances constitute a significant part of many people’s ego. Collective grievances can survive for centuries in the psyche of a nation or a tribe and fuel a never-ending cycle of violence. A grievance is a strong negative emotion connected to an event in the sometimes distant past that is being kept alive by compulsive thinking, by retelling the story in the head or out loud of ‘what someone did to me’ or ‘what someone did to us.’ “

This is negative emotional energy that can also impact other areas of your life, including your health, given what we know about the mind-body connection. 

Being Right, Making Wrong 

This is a great transition from complaining. As Tolle explains, “When you complain, by implication you are right and the person or situation you complain about or react against is wrong. There is nothing that strengthens the ego more than being right. Being right is identification with a mental position—a perspective, an opinion, a judgement, a story.”

Personally, I am very passionate about information about our world, more so because so much about what is happening on our planet isn’t really presented in mainstream media. When you come across cool facts, you want to share them with others. But when you share information with others, sometimes they are viewed as challenges, and people  cut you off or ignore you, or are triggered to share even more information because they want to show that “they know a lot too.” That’s their ego. If they are challenged by new information, or by your also having knowledge, factors associated with ego will step in, and it’s a great lesson if you can watch and be aware of your emotional trigger and reaction. If, for example, you were a child sharing facts with an adult, the adult would be encouraging, and listen with wonder and awe at the child’s enthusiasm. But if you change that child into an adult and share the same information, the adult, in most cases, does not see the enthusiasm and can in fact be blinded by their own desire to know more, or to be right.

“For you to be right, of course, you need someone else to be wrong, and so the ego loves to make wrong in order to be right. In other words: You need to make others wrong in order to get a stronger sense of you you are. Not only a person, but also a situation can be made wrong through complaining and reactivity, which always implies that ‘this should not be happening.’ Being right places you in a position of imagined moral superiority in relation to the person or situation that is being judged and found wanting. It is that sense of superiority the ego craves and through which it enhances itself.” 

In Defence of an Illusion

Tolle brings up a great point here. As I mentioned above with the child example, facts exist, and sometimes we want to share them. This doesn’t mean that they always come from a place or intention of “being right,” or the ego, but rather a place of genuine passion and curiosity.

“Facts undoubtedly exist. If you say: ‘Light travels faster than sound,’ and someone else says the opposite in the case, you are obviously right, and he is wrong. The simple observation that lightning precedes thunder could confirm this. So not only are you right, but you know you are right. Is there any ego involved in this? Possibly, but not necessarily. If you are simply stating what you know to be true, the ego is not involved at all, because there is no identification. Identification with what? With mind and a mental position. Such identification, however, can easily creep in. If you find yourself saying, ‘Believe me, I know’ or ‘Why do you never believe me’ then ego has already crept in. . . . A simple statement: ‘Light is faster than sound,’ although true, is not in the service of illusion, of ego. It has become contaminated with a false sense of ‘I’; it has become personalized, turned into a mental position. The ‘I’ Feels diminished or offended because somebody doesn’t believe what ‘I’ said.”

Working in alternative media, and being an avid researcher of the entire human experience, I know what this is like. I’ve experienced anger when I share information and people don’t me. Inside, I always knew that that reaction was unnecessary, and that the response “I” receive shouldn’t matter, because I am comfortable within my own knowing.

Tolle goes on to describe the problem of the “I am right and you are wrong” type of mentality, and all of the trouble it’s caused for the world. He describes it as one of the ways the ego fuels itself, stating that “making yourself right and others wrong is a mental dysfunction that perpetuates separation and conflict between human beings.”

Does this mean that there is no such thing as “right” or “wrong?” Not necessarily. You can remain in your truth, and the truth you perceive to be, without the need to push it on others, or defend your position. To each his own.

You can still share your own truth without the need to be right, or to “win” an argument. If you are sharing information to be right or to “win,” as opposed to simply sharing from your soul, from your passion, from your excitement to share information, then you’re engulfed in your ego and allowing it to grow.

The Ego Is Not Personal

“On a collective level, the mind-set ‘We are right and they are wrong’ is particularly deeply entrenched in those parts of the world where conflict between two nations, races, tribes, religions, or ideologies is long-standing, extreme, and endemic. Both sides of the conflict are equally identified with their own perspective, their own ‘story,’ that is to say, identified with thought. Both are equally incapable of seeing that another perspective, another story, may exist and also be valid. Israeli writer Y. Halevi speaks of the possibility of ‘accommodating a competing narrative,’ but in many parts of the world, people are not yet able or willing to do that. Both sides believe themselves to be in possession of the truth. Both regard themselves as victims and the ‘other’ as evil, and because they have conceptualized and thereby dehumanized the other as the enemy, they can kill and inflict all kinds of violence on the other, even on children, without feeling their humanity and suffering.”

This is a great point, and shows how at the micro level, in everyday life, the human ego is present, which is also reflective of the collective attitude of “us” against “them.” Whether this narrative is being upheld and encouraged purposefully to create more separation between people, to further elitist agendas, is a topic for another debate, however. But the point is, we are in control. If more people on the planet worked on diminishing aspects of the ego, we would see a collective transformation as well, and perhaps that’s exactly what we’re going through: a collective evolution.

“Greed, selfishness, exploitation, cruelty, and violence are still all-pervasive on this plant. When you don’t recognize them as individual and collective manifestations of an underlying dysfunction or mental illness, you fall into the error of personalizing them. You construct a conceptual identify for an individual or group, and you say ‘This is who he is. This is who they are.’ When you confuse the ego that you perceive in others with their identity, it is the work of your own ego that uses this misperception to strengthen itself through being right and therefore superior, and through reacting with condemnation, indignation, and often anger against the perceived enemy. All this is enormously satisfying to the ego.” 

Concluding Comments 

Ego can be difficult to understand and discuss effectively, but it’s something that’s at the core of creating a change in the current human experience. Once humanity learns to transcend the collective ego, we will make tremendous advancements in how we communicate with each other, and probably enter into an age of abundance, or, “A New Earth.” It’s a key component of not just global change, but changes within our own personal lives as well.

There are many opportunities to transcend your ego, to lose your buttons so they cannot be pushed, to diminish your need to always be right or label others according to your own limited perceptions. The points made above from Tolle are simply a few important ones out of many, and you will no doubt gain a better understanding by checking out A New Earth, the book that inspired this article.

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Personal Development

The Barriers We Build Against Love

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In Brief

  • The Facts:

    As children we needed to be loved. We were entirely dependent on the adults around us, so the way they acted towards us - and each other - has had a big impact on how we show up to love as adults.

  • Reflect On:

    What are some of the barriers you put up that stop you from feeling your own love? At what age were these barriers to love created and why?

“Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all the barriers within yourself that you have built against it.” ~ Rumi

Many people are still looking for their ‘other half’, venturing out on more and more dates, casting the net wider until they find someone to complete them. And when it doesn’t work out just as they planned, they jump back onto their smartphones, ‘unfriend’ the offending partner and swipe themselves another one.

And yet many of us also know that, deep down, another human being is never going to be able to make us whole and that the fairy tale of meeting our Prince/ss Charming is just that – a fairy tale. We understand that true love comes from within and when we love ourselves – fully – only then can we truly love another.

This is great, in theory, because for many of us, self-love stuff is still very much an intellectual concept that we strive to reach in the same way that some people strive to meet someone new when their last relationship hits a wall. Striving for self-love is not the essence of self-love. Discovering the barriers to love may well be what we need.

Barriers to love

Rumi is rumoured to have said that our task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all the barriers within ourselves that we have built against it. It’s likely that he knew a thing or two about life and love. Self-love can be tricky – sure, we get it, intellectually. We know it’s necessary to “love ourselves” but aside from eating healthier, daily exercise and spending more time doing the things we love, it can be hard to get over that ultimate hurdle.

So what is it that gets in the way? What are these barriers that Rumi speaks of and why are they there at all?

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We all have them. They’re made up of the internal voices that tell us that we “don’t deserve to be loved and happy”. Or that there’s something intrinsically ‘wrong’ with us. That we are somehow ‘broken’ and if anyone actually found out the truth about us they would surely leave us.

These barriers to love are constantly running in the background; a low hum that unconsciously speaks to everything we do, every action (and inaction) we take. Unlike the self-loving ‘apps’ that we consciously choose (weekly yoga sessions, salad and connecting with friends), these barriers form a part of our internal ‘operating system’ and are generally in shadow for us.

What you realize is, we don’t need to go out and love ourselves, we already do, we simply need to take down the barriers blocking that.

We Are Not Born With These Barriers

Not one of us came into this world with pre-erected barriers to love; it’s learned behaviour. We learned them from the adults around us at the time. We might have learned that ‘love’ was scary and shouty, or that if you love someone it should be dramatic. We might have learned that ‘love’ was silent, sulky and certainly not communicated through affection.

What was happening around you as a child has likely informed your decisions about the type of partner you choose as an adult. Repeating patterns are not always pleasant, but they’re certainly familiar.

In addition to how we saw the world and what we learned about love when we were children, we were also extremely vulnerable. Something as subtle as having overly critical or emotionally unavailable parents can have a big impact on who and how you are as an adult. Through little eyes, the world can look like a dangerous place and it’s likely that you employed protection strategies that may have stopped you from getting hurt, emotionally or physically.

Creating a tough outer shell or a sentinel-like vigilance may have been necessary when you were 3 feet tall, but how is that working for you now? How are the protective behavioural patterns you employed as a child serving you in your life as an adult?

In my own life, I have sometimes struggled to connect fully; to really let my partner in. My experience as a child taught me that loving relationships were not easy and they wouldn’t last. So as an adult, it felt safer to never let anyone come too close, in case the same thing happened again.

All the self-loving actions in the world couldn’t compete with my unconscious internal message that love was unsafe and ultimately destined to end.

Whilst it may sound quite depressing; on the contrary, I have found it to be massively empowering. As I now know this about myself, I can make a decision when I feel myself withdrawing, I can choose to come closer and to see this as a pattern that was created many years ago in order to protect me – it’s not who I am. Because of this, I am now so much closer to my current partner.

Discovering your personal barriers to love

It’s taken me many years to discover my own barriers to love and I’m still uncovering more and more layers of the onion each day. There’s no one-size-fits-all when it comes to discovering what’s getting in the way of you and the love you deserve, but there are proven tools and techniques that can help. My most recent ‘ah-ha’ moment came whilst taking part in an online workshop known as the Groundwork.

Collective Evolution readers get 25% off the standard price and you will get to learn more about some of the tools and techniques I used at www.dothegroundwork.com (use the coupon code: collective to get your 25% discount).

When you discover your unique barriers to love, know that you created them a long time ago with your own best interests and safety at heart. Dissolve them with the love they were created with; acknowledging and thanking the little one, that still lives inside you, for being there and for doing the best they could when things got tough.

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Consciousness

‘Black Jesus’ Story Stunningly Corroborated In An Obscure Nexus Magazine Article

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In Brief

  • The Facts:

    An obscure Nexus article from 2001 provides stunning details about the 'Black Jesus' story told by David Wilcock from an earlier article, and sheds important light on the brutality inflicted in Africa by Colonial powers and the Roman Catholic Church.

  • Reflect On:

    Does this information help make it clear that our mainstream perception of history and of other cultures has been a tightly controlled deception by Western powers?

One of our readers named Antonia, who had read my previous article ‘The Incredible Story Of The “Black Jesus” From The 1960s,’ was kind enough to send me a PDF file of a back issue from Nexus Magazine containing the article, “An African Messiah: The Third Secret Of Fatima?” (Nexus Magazine 2001 Volume 8, Number 5). Years back she had heard stories about this Nexus article from her uncle, and contacted Nexus in the hopes they could locate it. After a weeks-long process they found it and converted it to a PDF for her (there were only paper copies at the time). This article provided me with some fascinating corroborating details about the ‘Black Jesus’ story, in addition to some fresh insights into African history that I had never heard of or even imagined before.

In the excerpt from the article below, there is testimony that corroborates the idea that a man with supernatural abilities, pictured above and going by the name Simeon Toko, had been able to bring himself to life in front of astonished witnesses after having been slaughtered to pieces. Furthermore, while in my previous article David Wilcock recounted that those trying to kill the ‘Black Jesus’ were the ‘cabal’, this Nexus article more specifically identifies the Vatican and the Catholic Missionaries/Priests in Africa as having a big hand in this, and it was clearly not an isolated incident. Cruel and oppressive actions were typical of the Catholic Church throughout their forage into Africa, which provides us with a clear context for our story that is worth highlighting here:

The damage that Christian missionaries have done to the psychology of human kindness in Africa over the centuries is untold. Missionaries routinely accompanied soldiers who came to steal lands and loot for their home European country. The procedure went as follows: the missionary would stand and read aloud an edict in Latin to whatever villagers had gathered. The edict, completely incomprehensible to the villagers, ordered that each of them must at that moment convert to Christianity or be killed or enslaved. After it was read, the guns and swords were put to work. The soldiers felt justified in their murders through the benediction and authority of the Roman Church. Through varying interpretations of the works of Church fathers, the Roman Church developed a system of permissible murder and looting, and it was used routinely.

The missionaries would then go to work on the remaining people. The children were taught that their parents’ intelligent, peaceful beliefs were “from the devil” and that they were to accept poverty “for the good of their souls”, whereas the conquerers were supposedly blessed by God with superior might and wealth and so had to be obeyed.

The article also describes African culture in ways that were quite eye-opening to me, in that I didn’t realize how much I had retained the brainwashing of Western propaganda in terms of my knowledge and understanding of the people and the character of African societies:

Much of the media news from Africa in the past 80 years has been presented as political rebellion and tribal warmongering or as a battle between “good” civilised countries versus “evil” communists over the souls of Africans who are still considered uncivilised, superstitious and too immature, individual by individual, to be left to themselves…what with all those raw materials and diamonds yet needing to be dug up. This is the general bias of news reporting from Africa as I remember it since my own childhood. It’s not much different now. We tend to think of the African peoples with a distortion somewhere between a bouquet of jokes about banana republics and a vague, distant horror of unexplainable war and slaughter.

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The first slave traders who came to Africa in the 15th century CE found an advanced society dominated by a monotheism with a powerful code of ethics. They did not find half-naked people in grass skirts with bones through their noses. They did not find rows of fat little stone fertility goddesses and voodoo fetishes. They found an intelligent, friendly, dignified people who had created beautiful avenues, pleasant buildings, well-regulated agricultural fields and fine clothing.

Because of the length of the article, I have divided it into two parts. This first part gives an important background to the life of Simeon Toko. Know that the writing is a bit dense and has many Christian undertones, but I think this is an important part of understanding the zeitgeist in Africa at that time, and is certainly worth your time and effort to plow through. You will find a link to second part, which describes the life and miracles of Simeon Toko, the ‘Black Jesus,’ at the end of this article.

An African Messiah: The Third Secret Of Fatima? (Part 1 – Background)

Few Westerners are aware of the spectacular religious activity that has been thundering with incalculable exuberance through the hearts of millions of Africans in our just-passed century. Men and women have been seeing vision after vision, sign after sign, and wonder after wonder. There are national holidays commemorating miracles—not from centuries ago by some old saint whose paint has long since peeled, but within the last few decades and witnessed by thousands of ordinary citizens still walking among us.

Religious scholars whom I have contacted as independent sources have been recording the activity with intense fascination. Relatively little is known, and scholars are quite eager to learn more. They may be gathering information that could eventually form a “new” New Testament. It may well be that we are viewing the beginnings of a new civilization formed around a new Christ, which, like the occasion that started our present one 20 centuries ago, remains relatively unknown in the world until some time after the events that then inspire so many millions for centuries to come.

This book extract featured here is primarily about a man named Simeon Toko, who died in 1984. Simeon Toko appeared before people in an apparitional body and in dream states while he was physically alive, and continues to do the same among certain selected people 17 years after his willing, natural death. At least one witness says that he, personally, killed this man—quite professionally, as a hired killer—and saw him alive again a few days later. Others still living at the time of this writing say they saw Toko physically slaughtered, and watched him bring himself back to life before their astonished eyes. There is a very large body of testimony, of which only a little has yet been recorded or written down from eyewitnesses.

Much of the media news from Africa in the past 80 years has been presented as political rebellion and tribal warmongering or as a battle between “good” civilised countries versus “evil” communists over the souls of Africans who are still considered uncivilised, superstitious and too immature, individual by individual, to be left to themselves…what with all those raw materials and diamonds yet needing to be dug up. This is the general bias of news reporting from Africa as I remember it since my own childhood. It’s not much different now. We tend to think of the African peoples with a distortion somewhere between a bouquet of jokes about banana republics and a vague, distant horror of unexplainable war and slaughter.

The first slave traders who came to Africa in the 15th century CE found an advanced society dominated by a monotheism with a powerful code of ethics. They did not find half-naked people in grass skirts with bones through their noses. They did not find rows of fat little stone fertility goddesses and voodoo fetishes. They found an intelligent, friendly, dignified people who had created beautiful avenues, pleasant buildings, well-regulated agricultural fields and fine clothing. They found a people who practised the old Mosaic code, essentially (students of Mosaic law will note how much of it resembles the Egyptian code). They found a people whose language (Kikongo), linguists have shown, contains scores of words found in biblical Hebrew and in later European languages and thus pre-dates these. They may well have found what happened to the so-called lost tribes of the kingdom of Israel.

Except that the subsequent four centuries have proved out the following statement to a deplorable degree, we could otherwise be incredulous at a surmisal of the main difference between the “discoverers” of central Africa and the people they divided and traded like objects and cattle over the ensuing generations: the difference between the civilised dark-skinned peoples and their conquerors is measurable in intensity of greed and the will to murder to fulfill greed’s endlessly wearisome demands. This behaviour has not ended in modern times.

Slavery still exists in Africa, for instance. Now, centuries after the first slashes into the belly of the African land and peoples, predominantly white-skinned countries still allow predominantly white-skinned corporations to assist insane warlords in killing each other, helping with helicopters and technology simply to keep company profits going. So reported Global Pacific News not long ago.

There is no question that the peoples of Africa, millions and millions of descendants of the ancient Ethiopians and Egyptians among them, have been methodically dehumanised for centuries. No peoples have met with such enormous psychological and material destruction in recorded human history. If they can be said to be blamed for allowing any of it, then their fault could only lie in a willingness to trust fellow men who come preaching principles.

The damage that Christian missionaries have done to the psychology of human kindness in Africa over the centuries is untold. Missionaries routinely accompanied soldiers who came to steal lands and loot for their home European country. The procedure went as follows: the missionary would stand and read aloud an edict in Latin to whatever villagers had gathered. The edict, completely incomprehensible to the villagers, ordered that each of them must at that moment convert to Christianity or be killed or enslaved. After it was read, the guns and swords were put to work. The soldiers felt justified in their murders through the benediction and authority of the Roman Church. Through varying interpretations of the works of Church fathers, the Roman Church developed a system of permissible murder and looting, and it was used routinely.

The missionaries would then go to work on the remaining people. The children were taught that their parents’ intelligent, peaceful beliefs were “from the devil” and that they were to accept poverty “for the good of their souls”, whereas the conquerors were supposedly blessed by God with superior might and wealth and so had to be obeyed.

Not long ago, Pope John-Paul II issued a public statement apologizing for the behaviour of the Roman Church during the Inquisition, centuries ago. Over a period of about 400 years, Church authorities humiliated, ostracised, tortured and murdered about half a million fellow Europeans over “matters of faith”. As these atrocities in the name of God mostly occurred centuries ago, the apology seemed a little late in coming. However, no apology seems to have been offered yet to the estimated 100 million Africans who were categorically enslaved, tortured and murdered into submission in the 400 years that the Roman Church itself assisted this activity, quite officially, benefiting from it materially and politically.

SIMON KIMBANGU: A PERSECUTED PROPHET

One would wonder also why there is as yet no apology forthcoming from the Vatican for its role in intent to murder one Simon Kimbangu. This did not happen so long ago that the descendants have long been unaware of the wrong done and the property confiscated, as is mostly the case with the Inquisition. There were thousands of Africans alive at the time of this writing who remember Simon Kimbangu very well. Kimbangu’s name is celebrated throughout the great expanses of central Africa, and his fame continues to increase. He stands as far more than a mere national hero. A short history of his life can be found in the Encyclopaedia Britannica. He and his followers are also the subject of more detailed scholarly research.

Simon Kimbangu was a prophet. He was tortured and left to rot in prison, where he died in October 1951 after 30 years. There are Africans alive at this writing who were brought back from the dead by Simon Kimbangu, and there are people still living who watched him do it. The claim is that Simon Kimbangu healed the sick, made the lame walk, returned sight to the blind and hearing to the deaf, and even brought back to life an infant who had been dead for three days. Kimbangu performed these miraculous deeds over a period of five months, from May 1921 through to 12 September 1921. Scholars do not dispute that this man performed these miracles. There is simply too much testimony about it.

On 10 September 1921, Simon Kimbangu gave a speech. He announced that the colonial authorities were about to arrest him and “impose a long period of silence on my body”. He announced that one day a “Great King” of tremendous spiritual, scientific and political power would arise, and that he himself would return as a representative. Before this event, a certain book would be written that would prepare the people of Kongo (not “Congo”) for this event. This book would be resisted, but slowly it would come to be accepted. Two days later, Simon Kimbangu was arrested by colonial authorities— on his 42nd birthday, 12 September 1921—and curtly sentenced to death.

The authorities for the Roman Church had recommended his execution, and so had various other Christian missions. According to noted scholar Dr. Allan Anderson, the Baptist mission alone protested the execution of this man whose apparent crime was to have stood in a village daily for five months and healed, consoled and revitalised people. The joy and the amazement of the gathering crowds had left the prophet open to supposed charges of sedition by jealous missionaries. Punishment for alleged sedition was death.

Just as Kimbangu had predicted two days before his arrest, he was instead given an indefinite prison term, a “long silence of his body”. Each morning he was taken from his tiny cell and put bodily into a tank of cold salt water for lengthy periods in an attempt to hasten his death. His prediction that his body would be tortured and humiliated came true.

He had also predicted that day that Africa would be “thrown into a terrible period of unspeakable persecutions”. For the next 40 years, Africans were indeed put through a terrible period of unspeakable religious persecutions. Hundreds of thousands were imprisoned, deported, separated from their families, subject to atrocious tortures and simply persecuted for new religious beliefs. These new religious beliefs, triggered by the few words of an African man who performed miracles among his own people for “only a little while”, sent out great psychological rays of hope to a continent of peoples who had long become accustomed to misery and poverty under centuries of colonial abuse and deliberately oppressive religious instruction. These powerful beliefs are still in development and will reach around the world even in their beginning stages. The appearance of the book this essay reviews marks one of many such beginnings.

THE FATIMA PROPHECIES AND RELIGIOUS CODES

The title of the book this essay introduces is The True Third Secret of Fatima Revealed and the Return of Christ. The author is Pastor Melo Nzeyitu Josias, and additional research was done by Rocha Nefwani. Both men are native Africans, both highly educated.

I edited the book myself, here in America, and added a little general historical knowledge. The book was meant to be available on the 13th of May, to commemorate the first of six visits of the Lady of Fatima, Portugal, who appeared on that date in 1917. She was visible to the three shepherd children who repeated her words to the world, yet was invisible to the crowds of thousands who were drawn to come to see her. The Lady made astonishing predictions. Her two sets of predictions, made in 1917 about events of the coming decades, proved true. Among other things, she prophesied the fall of Russia to communism, the end of the First World War and the coming of the Second World War.

There was a Third Secret, however, which the Lady instructed Lucia dos Santos to reveal only after 1960, when certain events had passed which would have made it more understandable. It was read to Pope John XXIII in February 1960. When the Pope heard it, he fainted dead to the floor; when he arose, he ordered the Third Secret sealed up in a vault “forever”. Are we in the “end of times”? Are we at the hour in which Jesus Christ has already returned and gone? It would seem that appearances of men acclaimed to be God incarnate have increased greatly in the past century.

Whether a human being can be said to be God made flesh, let alone whether a particular individual can be said to be this, can be debated into meaninglessness. Those few who are said to have become “god-realised” and who have made themselves known to the public for divine purposes and missions, seem to attract material fortunes from a public that is either inexpressibly grateful or is too gullible. Although some Hindu religious branches speak of “five Ascended Masters” who live invisibly on our planet, there are many quite visible gurus or proclaimed avatars, around whom devotees have formed practical organisations of high material worth.

Monies are collected and practical advantages, such as political contributions, these keep the organisations going, while their intent is to “enlighten” the masses—who, we must assume, are “endarkened” without them. Sincere or fraudulent, authentic or imitation, each event of the appearance of a man (usually a male) said to be God or godrealised represents a new bud of one size or another upon a very ancient vine. The vine would be human consciousness, and the bud would be civilisation. A civilisation forms through codes of knowledge and behavior that allow each of its members, relatively, the broadest opportunity for value fulfilment. The codes seem most often to have originated with a single man who is also revealed as God’s prophet, if not God Himself in fleshly clothing. New knowledge, or interpretations of it, is added in that Man-God’s name.

I wonder about the nature of the human experience itself, as I cannot think of any civilisation which did not attribute its foundations to a single man at its cornerstone. Even the “godless” communist attempts at a new and sensible kind of civilisation quickly became personality-worship cults. Nor should we forget Germany’s abortive attempt to found a “New World Order” around Adolf Hitler. However, neither Hitler nor Marx nor Lenin nor Mao nor Kim could walk on water or rise from the dead.

Christianity, of all religions, has come closest to uniting the peoples of the entire world. The emergence of avatars in Africa in the 20th century maintains a continuity with the ancient prophecies found in the Bible. The True Third Secret cites biblical passages that make a case that Simeon Toko was Christ Returned—at least, different Christian ministers who considered the interpretations did not scorn their logic.

<End Part 1 of Nexus Article> 

Richard’s Note: You can continue with the second part of the Nexus article which details the life and miracles of Simeon Toko in my follow-up article ‘This African Man Brought Himself Back To Life After His Body Was Chopped To Pieces’.

The Takeaway

I look at the realization of my own ignorance about the true nature of African civilization as a spark to amp up my search for the truth behind the lies and false perceptions that have been built by Western powers who have been labelled the Cabal or the Illuminati. Much insight can be gleaned from this article as to the role of the Vatican and the Christian Church not only in their own self-aggrandizement, but as part of a larger plan for world domination by the Illuminati.

The fact that I was alerted to this important information by one of our readers is really a symbol of what we are trying to do here at CE: endeavor to work together with the Awakening Community in order to share and proliferate the truth. I have benefited greatly from the time and effort my readers have taken to comment on subjects I have written about, giving me greater confidence in some of my points of analysis and offering me greater discernment in other points. I truly feel blessed to be participating in this great awakening in the way I have been afforded in my role with CE. Our CE team has already spoken here about how, as our fundraising continues to expand, we will be coming up with new and exciting ways in which our community can become more involved with us in our shared awakening process.

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Consciousness

This African Man Brought Himself Back To Life After His Body Was Chopped To Pieces

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In Brief

  • The Facts:

    An obscure Nexus article from 2001 provides stunning details about 'Black Jesus' Simeon Toko, including surviving having his heart cut out, stopping a plane in mid-air, and recomposing his body after it had been chopped to pieces by a sower.

  • Reflect On:

    Can we suspend our disbelief for a moment and consider these miraculous stories possible? If so, how does this impact our perception of reality?

(This is a continuation of the article ‘Obscure Nexus Article Reveals Stunning Corroboration For The ‘Black Jesus’ Story,’ which I believe provides essential context for this story, and should be read first if you haven’t already.)

As I had mentioned in the previous article above, a back issue of a Nexus article from 2001 provided excellent corroboration and stunning new details about the alleged ‘Black Jesus’ that I wrote about in an earlier article ‘The Incredible Story Of The “Black Jesus” From The 1960s,’ where I retold a ‘top-secret’ story that David Wilcock had received from one of his insiders. The story described an African man who was able to come back to life after having been killed in increasingly horrid ways. Here is an example of this that you will find in the excerpt below:

One of the Portuguese foremen showed up and hailed Simeon Toko: “Hey Simeon, you see that tractor over there? There are weeds clogging the sower. Go clean them out!” Submissively, the docile prisoner crawled under the engine to fix it. When he was under the engine, the foreman, sitting in the driver’s seat, started it up, which automatically activated the rotating blades of the seed sower. Simeon Toko’s body was instantly severed in several pieces.

Terrified, Canhandi stood frozen to the spot, watching. The foreman shifted into reverse to back up and check the damage. A second foreman, who was in service that day, flashed a victory sign, indicating that they had succeeded. Then the unbelievable happened. Before Canhandi and the two Portuguese accomplices, the body of Simeon Toko recomposed itself! Simeon Toko stood up! Canhandi could not believe his eyes. The Portuguese ran away in terror.

Following is an incredible testimony of but a few of the miracles of Simeon Toko, and perhaps more importantly, a better understanding of our human history, including the tremendous efforts of those in power to distort and suppress information such as this based on their agenda.

An African Messiah: The Third Secret Of Fatima? (Part 2 – The Avatar Simeon Toko)

[Tom Dark* notes: The following is an excerpt I have culled from chapter VII of the book, with permission (some of the writing has been edited so as not to confuse the reader who will be reading this out of its context)]

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Fragile Beginnings

Simeon Toko was born on 24 February 1918 in a village in northern Angola (the Tsafon of Psalm 48:3), portentously named Sadi Banza Zulu Mongo (“Village of the Celestial Mountain”). The newborn emerged from his mother’s womb into a very hostile environment. For almost 50 years, from 1872 to 1921, this region suffered natural disasters. There were long droughts between short lulls. Northern Angola and the southern regions of the French and Belgian Congos were devastated. The resultant famines killed thousands; so, too, there were thousands of deaths brought by smallpox, typhoid, sleeping sickness, malaria and other diseases. These different plagues represent the fulfilment of a biblical prediction. None but a few people inspired by the words of the Lord recognised this.

And the dragon stood before which was ready to be delivered, for to devour her child as soon as it was born. (Revelation 12:4)

The baby Simeon Toko was born mere inches from sickness and famine and plague and death, and many leagues from safety. There was not much reason for a baby to want to live, and much against it. The infant Toko caught smallpox. He was so badly affected by it that villagers thought the hand of the Almighty Father alone saved his life. He was left with the unpleasant marring of smallpox scars on his face. Compare this prophecy:

As many were astonished at thee; his visage was so marred more than any man, and his form more than the sons of men. (Isaiah 52:14)

Not long after Simeon’s birth, a missionary at a Baptist Missionary Society, based in Angola, had a dream. He dreamed that a Great King had been born in the region under his ministry. He decided to go looking for this baby. Requesting guidance from the Holy Spirit, he came to the baby Simeon Toko. Staring at an infant so rachitic, like a “weak and tender plant”, and with so blemished a little face, he shook his head. Doubt had come to stay. He asked one or two questions and left, feeling victimised by his dream and the voice that had led him there.

A Powerful Mission

In 1949, Simeon attended an international conference of Protestants in Leopoldville (currently called Kinshasa). During this event, the ceremonial masters asked three Africans from Angola to pray. Those selected were Gaspar de Almeida, Jesse Chiulo Chipenda and Simeon Toko. Simeon Toko asked in his public prayer that the Holy Spirit manifest in Africa to put an end to the abuses of the colonial powers. Toko became a dedicated member of the Baptist Church in Itaga. He formed a singing choir of 12 people. Instantly this choir became famous, and from 12 members it grew into hundreds. At each of the choir performances, whether at their church or while visiting another church, the Holy Ghost manifested with such a power that white missionaries suspected young Toko of possessing black-magic powers. Jealously, the missionaries summoned him to abandon his “dark practices”. He responded to them by saying: “But if we are praying to the same God, how come when I pray, and there is a manifestation of the Holy Ghost, you accuse me of sorcery? Is it because I am an African that my prayers couldn’t possibly be answered? Does the Holy Spirit discriminate against Africans, too?” (See 1 Samuel 10:10.)

But the missionaries were fed up with him and decided to exclude him from the church. Then what was meant to happen, happened. All those who had joined the church on the inspiration of Simeon’s magnificent choir left the church with him. The question was whether Simeon Toko would abandon these followers or keep them with him. He decided to keep them with him, realising all the same that a very harsh duty awaited him. He decided to pray again to his Father, repeating the same prayer he had made three years before at the Baptist conference.

On 25 July 1949, Simeon and 35 members of his choir met on a street called Mayenge, at the house of a man named Vanga Ambrosio. The choir began to sing, waiting for the time to pray. Shortly before midnight, Simeon Toko lifted his eyes to the sky and he addressed this prayer to his Father: “Father, I know you always answer my prayers. Now look; consider these sheep you have sent to me. This duty is so immense that without the Holy Spirit, the Comforter, we will never be able to achieve what you intended. The prayer I addressed to you three years ago, didn’t you hear it?”

At precisely midnight, a strong wind shook the house and the Holy Spirit possessed everyone at the prayer meeting, with the exception of a man called Sansão Alphonse, the choir leader. God let him remain in an ordinary frame of mind so that he could write down the testimonials and miracles taking place before his dumbfounded eyes. Many in the group were speaking in tongues.

Some saw heavenly light and heard celestial voices; others were able to communicate clearly with people several kilometres from where the prayer was taking place. The excitement about the miracles that happened at this new Pentecost led Simeon Toko’s followers to spread all over town and start preaching the building of God’s Kingdom. This attracted the attention of Belgian colonial authorities, who viewed the activity as a threatening commotion.

Within about three months, the police began jailing the preachers. They were jailed and prosecuted as promptly as were the Kimbanguists, the followers of Simeon Toko’s Messenger, Simon Kimbangu—who himself was imprisoned from 1921 until his death in 1951. Some were beheaded, burned alive in their homes, drowned in the river or shot without being prosecuted. Finally, the colonialists decided to deport them. The wives, husbands and children were separated from their families and homes by hundreds and even thousands of kilometres.

When miracles started taking place among the new followers of “Kimbangu”, the Belgian authorities tried to suffocate this new Messianic group at once. On 22 October 1949, Simeon Toko and 3,000 of his companions were put into two different jails, Ofiltra and Ndolo. After three months in the jails, a decree was passed to deport them out of the country. This is when Simeon Toko started revealing Himself.

The Belgian administrator of the jail in Ndolo was named Pirote. He abused the “Tokoist” prisoners, hurling racist insults. He always ended with: “Filthy nigger, you’re going back to nigger country in Angola!” Tired of this abuse, Simeon Toko replied sharply to Pirote: “Know that if there is a stranger here, it is you! To show you that I am home, the day you make the injustice of deporting me from Belgian Congo, I’ll have you carrying my bags alongside me!” Simeon Toko held up both hands, spread out his fingers, and told the abusive Belgian to count them. He said: “I give 10 years to the Belgians, not one more or less, to leave this country!”

No one at that time comprehended these sibylline words. However, the disciples of Simeon Toko understood later: the day they were deported, Pirote fell dead. He was gripped with an apparent heart attack while working in his office, and died as suddenly as though a bullet had struck him squarely.

As for the other mysterious statement made by Simeon Toko: 10 years later, in 1960, the Belgians were obliged to leave their rich colony of Congo. But to impel this event, Simeon Toko “unleashed his army”. This incredible story is very well known throughout central Africa, and will be reported in greater detail in another book. The event was witnessed by thousands of people on 4 January 1959. Some of the author’s own relatives were there, but so are there thousands of citizens of the city of Kinshasa, who witnessed it on that day, alive at this writing. January 4th is now a public holiday in Kinshasa and commemorates this event. Kinshasa was called Leopoldville. On that day, the “Cherubim and Seraphim” appeared and stood against the Belgian colonial army. The citizens of Leopoldville saw an army of about a thousand very small men, about the size of children or dwarfs, with very muscular, imposing bodies.

Each of these diminutive human-looking creatures showed great strength; for example, a witness saw one of them flip a five ton truck over with one arm! The Belgian soldiers fired at these little brown angels to no effect. Terrified, the colonial army was thrown into confusion. The little men disappeared as suddenly as they had appeared. One year after this amazing mass apparition, the Democratic Republic of Congo was a new and independent country.

More Persecutions and Miracles

After being deported and arriving in Angola, the real tribulations of the “man of sorrow acquainted with grief and sufferings” were to start. Never again would Simeon Toko rest. His life would be a string of nonstop attempts to kill him to prevent his Mission. Let us follow what he experienced, from Leopoldville, where he was unjustly incarcerated, to Angola. While incarcerated in Angola, the Portuguese authorities deported him:

  1. to the Colonato of Vale do Loge, in the municipality of Bembe, northern Angola;
  2. from Bembe to Waba Caconda;
  3. from Caconda to Hoque, 30 kilometres off San da Bandeira;
  4. from San da Bandeira to Waba Caconda again:
  5. from Caconda to Cassinga, Vila Artur de Paiva;
  6. from Cassinga to Jau, in Chibia’s canton;
  7. from Chibia, back to San da Bandeira;
  8. from San da Bandeira to Mocamedes, in the municipality of Porto Alexandre, or, more precisely, at Ponta Albina.
  9. from Ponta Albina to Luanda, the capital of Angola.

All of these deportations took place in a 12-year period. Simeon Toko’s captivity in these prisons and agricultural compounds lasted from three months, as at San da Bandeira, to as long as five years, as at Ponta Albina. The objectives of these deportations were to reduce Simeon Toko’s influence and to dismantle his church. Contrarily, everywhere he and his followers were sent, they indoctrinated even more and more members into the belief of (what the Portuguese called) “Tokoism”. In the end, the Portuguese authorities decided to use their last measure: “Simeon Toko d e l e n d a [must be destroyed].”

Thus, when he was sent to slavery in an agricultural field in Caconda in southern Angola, his head was offered for a price. Two Portuguese foremen, excited by the reward, decided to take their chance. They put a plan into action to murder Simeon Toko. During a stay in Angola in 1994, we collected the testimony of Pastor Adelino Canhandi, who was a cook at the Caconda agricultural compound. He saw what happened.

Busy with cooking, he heard a voice calling him: “Canhandi, Canhandi, come here.” It was Simeon Toko. Once outside, surprised and curious, Toko told him “to stand there and be watchful. Once again, the Son of Man will be tested.” Strange words in particular for Canhandi, who was not then a Christian and didn’t understand the term or what Simeon Toko wanted of him. Curious, he watched.

One of the Portuguese foremen showed up and hailed Simeon Toko: “Hey Simeon, you see that tractor over there? There are weeds clogging the sower. Go clean them out!” Submissively, the docile prisoner crawled under the engine to fix it. When he was under the engine, the foreman, sitting in the driver’s seat, started it up, which automatically activated the rotating blades of the seed sower. Simeon Toko’s body was instantly severed in several pieces.

Terrified, Canhandi stood frozen to the spot, watching. The foreman shifted into reverse to back up and check the damage. A second foreman, who was in service that day, flashed a victory sign, indicating that they had succeeded. Then the unbelievable happened. Before Canhandi and the two Portuguese accomplices, the body of Simeon Toko recomposed itself! Simeon Toko stood up! Canhandi could not believe his eyes. The Portuguese ran away in terror.

From that day on, Canhandi believed in the Lord, and his entire family converted to the church of Simeon Toko. It was also that day that Simeon Toko made it known who he was behind that smallpox-marred face, purposefully behaving in accord with the following scripture:

Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay down my life that I might take it again. No man taketh it from me, but I lay it down of myself. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again. This commandment have I received of my Father. (John 10:17-18)

During Simeon Toko’s stay in Luanda, the capital of Angola, while he was in the process of being deported for the ninth time, another event happened to show his hidden and true identity. We should say that when he came on Earth in Palestine, Christ referred to Himself in the third person, using the term “the Son of Man”. This time, Canhandi was one of the rare persons to hear the Christ refer to Himself differently. Simeon most usually spoke of the Lord Jesus Christ, which meant to his followers that he, too, was a servant of Christ, like everybody else. Despite the miracles happening around him, he was just like a shadow; no one knew who he really was.

The Vatican and the Avatar

His followers were once again bewildered when they found out that two top-level emissaries had been dispatched by Pope John XXIII to Angola to meet Simeon Toko and deliver a personal message to him. One of the emissaries was unfortunate to fall ill with dysentery when he arrived in Luanda and wound up in a hospital. The other was received by Simeon Toko, and he said to him: “I am an emissary of Pope John XXIII, who personally mandated me and my colleague to come and ask you a single question: ‘Who are you?'”

Let us bear in mind that the year was 1962, two years after the fateful date when the Vatican had instructions to make public the Third Secret of Fatima. John XXIII had read the message, kept it a secret, and very likely had sent his emissaries to Simeon Toko with a sinking feeling in his heart. Simeon Toko responded: “I am amazed that a high-ranking person like the Pope is interested enough about my being to make you travel 8,000 kilometres just to meet me. The answer that you should give your master for me is in the biblical scripture, Matthew 11:2-6.” Let’s now put ourselves in Pope John XXIII’s shoes as he read the text suggested by Toko:

And now, when John had heard in the prison the works of Christ, he sent two of his disciples, and said unto him: Are thou he that should come, or do we look for another? Jesus answered and said unto them: Go and show John again those things which ye do hear and see: the blind receive their sight and the lame walk, the lepers are cleansed and the deaf hear, the dead are raised up and the poor have the gospel preached to them. And blessed is he, whosoever shall not be offended in me. (Matthew 11:2-6)

Using a brief biblical quotation, Simeon Toko gave Pope John XXIII to understand that what the Pope had found in the note written by Lucia dos Santos was true. Indeed, the former Cardinal Roncalli could have picked any name as Pope, but he chose “John”, so that now the scripture in Matthew that Simeon Toko sent him to read addressed him directly by name. Fearing who it was who was now living among the most disdained people on Earth, the Pope contacted the Portuguese dictator, Antonio de Salazar. On 18 July 1962, Simeon Toko was again arrested and deported; this time, not to some isolated corner in his native Angola but to Portugal—where his anticipated birth had been announced in 1917 in Fatima. [Tom Dark* notes: Tokoists contend that the true Third Secret of Fatima was in fact an announcement that Christ had returned to Earth, in the form of Simeon Toko.]

For Toko’s deportation to Portugal, a Portuguese Air Force plane was waiting for him. The plane had state-of-the-art telecommunication and navigation systems. In the plane sat a Catholic priest and members of Salazar’s secret police, the PIDEDGS, including the pilot and copilot. Their mission was to fly out over the Atlantic Ocean and, after about an hour’s distance, push Simeon Toko out of the plane into the deep sea. This was the same inhuman treatment that the Argentinian military used years later against their political opponents. Supposedly the Catholic priest was brought along on the plane to counteract the magic powers of the African through praying. But this skilfully planned project was about to backfire.

The moment the PIDE agents rose to subdue him and carry out their murder, Simeon Toko stood up and ordered the plane to stop. The aircraft stopped in mid-air! It stood still, not advancing an inch nor rising or falling backwards. The crew was stricken by panic. The priest could hardly breathe, and hoarsely huffed out desperate prayers. They all started imploring the p r e t o [Portuguese denigratory term denoting “nigger”] for mercy.

Simeon lifted his eyes and hands towards the heavens and after a short prayer he ordered the plane to move again. At once, the plane started moving. Simeon Toko related this story himself. For those who are skeptical, we would remind you that the authority of our sciences does not determine all that is possible on Earth or in Heaven. This same Personality stopped a storm on a sea for a group of terrified fishermen 2,000 years ago. He also walked across the surface of the water and inspired the Sun to weave and dance gaily at Fatima.

Simeon Survives a Morbid Experiment

As an “exiled political prisoner”, Simeon Toko was deprived of all human rights. We describe here one of the many murder attempts upon his body during his forced stay in Ponta Delgada, in the Archipelago of the Azores. He was assigned the chore of maintaining a lighthouse there. At a future date, we will publish a record of miracles performed by Simeon Toko, which were seen by eyewitnesses. Doña Laurinda Zaza is a v a t e [pronounced “vah-tay”]—a sort of prophetic trance medium—for present-day Toko followers. She experienced the following event as she saw it happen to Tio Simão (a nickname meaning “Uncle Simon”) while he was in exile in Portugal. Simeon Toko confirmed the fact of this event later, and revealed the physical damage that the doctors had done. Over the years, thousands of people saw this scarring on his chest.

“You could almost see Toko’s heart pounding in his chest through the scar; an almost unbearable sight,” Doña Laurinda said. This referred to a most remarkable attempt by these astonishingly misguided men to kill Simeon Toko under dictator Antonio de Salazar’s orders. This attempt, which would have been “first degree murder” if the victim were anyone else, took place shortly before his return to freedom in July 1974. [Tom Dark notes: Simeon Toko was not released by Salazar; the dictator was unseated by a revolution and Simeon was released in a general amnesty of political prisoners.]

A Portuguese doctor had been reading records about Toko’s alleged “invincibility” and invited several doctors from around Europe to perform an operation on him—an autopsy, under the pretext of removing a tumour from his chest. The doctors had him taken to a local civilian hospital. They put him on an operating table, cut a jagged, mortal wound in the left side of the centre of his chest, reached into his chest cavity and pulled out his still-beating heart. The aorta and other arteries were severed by scalpel and his heart was removed. Simeon lay dead, his body covered with the warm blood that splashed out of his heart and chest.

The doctors dumped Simeon Toko’s heart in a metal pan and took it to a laboratory in another room. They ran various tests on it—expecting to find what, they did not know. The gadgets and microscopes and probing showed there was nothing physically extraordinary or abnormal about Simeon Toko’s heart. The doctors concluded that this purloined organ would not have been the source of his invulnerability—if it can be said that men can make conclusions about any such thing.

The doctors had unquestionably killed this man in this macabre experiment, but to their horror and bewilderment, Simeon Toko came to on the operating table! His heartless corpse was moving of its own volition. He opened his eyes, sat up and looked at them, the chest wound by which they had casually murdered him gaping open. “Why are you persecuting me this way?” he said to them. “Give me back my heart!”

[Tom Dark notes: If there are medical records available to confirm this event independently, I do not have them now but would like to see them. All of us involved in this project here in the US consider ourselves “doubting Thomases”, to say the least, yet the stories of witnesses and followers have kept up our fascination.]

For now we will refrain from reporting many other significant events that happened that same day. We can let you know, however, that the exact time his heart was taken from him, Simeon Toko decided to give a finishing blow to Portuguese colonial power and rule over Angola. He returned to his native country of Angola on 31 August 1974, with the confidence his words would be fulfilled. A year later, on 11 November 1975, Angola gained its independence from Portugal.

A Departure by Choice

During the night of 31 December 1983 to 1 January 1984, when the death of Simeon Toko was announced by the media, thunderclaps of virtually seismic force and torrential rain burst the skies of Luanda. It had not rained in this area for several years. Meteorologists were mystified. For three days the rain fell continuously. The occurrence of this event was attributed to all the rumours surrounding the death of this great prophet. A certain politician was recognised as one of the toughest men surrounding Neto, President of the Republic of Angola. He was often called upon for delicate and confidential missions. The Portuguese, whom he fought during a 14-year war for the liberation of his country, had a good deal to say about him. His name aroused dread and awe. He led a resistance group specialising in chopping heads with c a t a n a s (machetes). This man was one of President Neto’s army officers. His name was Comandante Paiva. After hearing the news that Simeon Toko had died, Paiva rushed to where the body lay exposed for public viewing. He fought his way through the crowd of tens of thousands of people. He was astonished at the sight of it. He stood looking at Simeon’s body, and he asked to speak. He declared:

“It is not true that Simeon Toko is dead, because he is invulnerable!” To make such a public confession was blatantly incriminating. Seven years before, Comandante Paiva had orders to kill Simeon Toko once and for all. He told the public that this is what he and his men had done. He had Simeon Toko kidnapped and taken to a secret location; once there, he butchered him methodically, like a meatpacker with an animal carcass; he severed Simeon’s head, then his arms and legs, then split his chest and abdomen apart. He stuffed the butchered corpse into a large bag, tied the top with a string and hid it in a certain location. After three days, he brought helpers back to get the bag and take it to the ocean to throw to the sharks.

By now the bag had disappeared. The men began to argue about its whereabouts. Suddenly, in the midst of their bickering about who may have moved it, a voice they described as sounding like “the sounds of many waters” (Revelation 1:15) overshadowed their own voices: “Who are you looking for? I am here!” It was Simeon Toko, in flesh and bone, alive, standing majestically. The men dashed away shouting “E o Deus, e o Deus!“, which means “He is God, He is God!”

Paiva’s butchering had been the last time that anybody dared to touch a single hair on the head of Simeon Toko. And now that Simeon’s body lay discarded by its owner, by choice, Paiva refused to believe it.

<End Part 2 of Nexus Article>

The Takeaway

With stories like this, many people say that if it was ‘true’ then it would be common knowledge: ‘we would have heard about it.’ Yet this story itself is testimony of how systematically and ruthlessly the powerful group we have called the ‘cabal’ or the ‘Illuminati’ have worked throughout history to suppress the truth in order to control the perception people have about our history, about the nature of civilization, and about ourselves. The article tells us that there were countless many eyewitnesses to some of the miracles of Simeon Toko, but we have been conditioned to believe that these are just the superstitious imaginings of an uncivilized race of people.

Part of our coming to a greater understanding of the truth of our origins, our history, and our nature involves our discernment about things which we have previously understood to be myth, folklore, or religious fervor. Everything must be considered in the context of the belief system/paradigm of the writer and of the times, and, as in this case, the Christian perspective must be embraced fully in order to plumb to the depths of the story and evaluate whether things actually happened the way they are being told. We will probably be surprised one day to find that many stories of the past we have relegated to the domain of insubstantial myth or superstitious religious fervor turn out to have actually happened.

*(Editor’s notes within the text are from Tom Dark, who was the editor of the book entitled ‘The True Third Secret of Fatima Revealed and the Return of Christ by Pastor Melo Nzeyitu Josias that is the source of Tom Dark’s Nexus article referred to here.)

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